Sturdy portable/rollable shelves?

How about grabbing some rectangular pieces of wood, drilling holes through the four corners of each piece, sticking pipes up through the corner holes, and then attaching wheels to the bottom of the pipes. Maybe using some wood glue on the wood to fortify the pipe entry and exit points, with notches in the pipe for holding the wood, etc.
The best strong and light shelving material, if not wood?
For storing tools and whatever other household items. Anywhere between 3 feet and 6 feet tall. I noticed a design is to put two wheels on one side but not on the other, wheelbarrow style.
I'm not trying to invent something, I'm asking for comments and/or other ideas. Naturally I want the movable shelves to be sturdy but light as possible. They will roll on low friction carpet here.
Thanks.
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Or maybe something like these Sterilite (plastic) Shelving Units, with wheels added.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
(Amazon.com product link shortened)53626429&sr=8-42&keywords=shelving+material
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On Thu, 22 Nov 2012 23:40:35 +0000 (UTC), John Doe

Great for storing Pampers and other lightweight materials. However....putting heavy stuff on them...disaster
Google "Gorilla" Shelving
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
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On 11/22/2012 11:34 PM, Gunner wrote:

They're rated at 150-lb/shelf which ain't terrible and have good reviews for sturdy from purchasers...look like be worth a chance't on one for a trial w/ not much to lose...
--
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dpb wrote:

Gunner's right. They WILL hold 150 pounds per shelf, and sag quite a bit. Try pushing a loaded one around on wheels and it will collapse with a lot less weight. The only way to add wheels would be to put it on a dolly made of heavy plywood or metal. More expense than the crappy things are worth. I have a few that hold bulky, light weight boxed computer parts. I used one to store canned goods for a little while, and it''s very warped now.
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On Fri, 23 Nov 2012 12:43:33 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

Lots of folks forget the difference between Static Load and Dynamic load.
And it costs them gear at the worst possible moment
Gunner
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1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
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On Friday, November 23, 2012 2:54:27 PM UTC-8, Gunner wrote:

True dat. When the wheel goes over a bump, and the '150#' shelf has a 50# point load at the midpoint, and the shelf takes a permanent bend, and the expensive item hits the floor...
You want (for wood) a torsion-box for stability, which means shelves AND A BACK. And for steel, you want large margins of load, before it's reasonable to add the rumble of little wheels to the problem.
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http://www.rapidrack.com /
http://www.gorillarack.com/raptor/rhino-rack-i-75.html
http://www.gorillarack.com/about-us-i-61.html
I thought you wanted shelves to hold heavy stuff.. 150lbs..isnt squat.
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1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
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You would be best served buying used Metro Racks with casters. I have one of those.
i

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This is basically what I was thinking about, without wheels.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)53647443&sr=8-6&keywords=shelves
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I see several flaws in this idea. First, the shelves have no sides and no back. If you intend to roll the unit around, the stuff on the shelves is likely to fall off. Second, and probably more important, the unit really doesn't look sturdy. Lacking the cross-bracing that a back and sides would provide, I doubt that it will hold up to the stress of being moved, especially on carpet. It will likely twist and "rack" a bit each time, further weakening whatever connects the pipes to the chipboard shelves.
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Greg Guarino <gdguarino gmail.com> wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)53647443&sr=8-6&keywords=shelves
That type of shelving has a multitude of positive reviews from people who have actually used them.

Lots of shelves have no sides and no back. You can always put stuff in a box on the shelf, like on so many other shelves. And, at least here, I'm not planning on constantly moving the stuff around.

Or, you could use sturdy pipes and solid & thick joints.
In fact, I was thinking about using a thin shelving surface with small blocks of 2 x 4 glued under the corners. That would provide about 2 inches of sturdy contact with the pipe at each corner of each shelf.
But I'm also thinking about using the wall as a brace, and using only two pipes instead of four. Will see.
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I'll take your word for it. Have any of those people added wheels?

And they're less sturdy as a result. Which might be OK if they never move and aren't loaded too heavily. 1 You can always put

When you say "contact with the pipe", how do you envision building this exactly? I've been assuming that you mean to use sections of "pipe" as long as the space between the shelves. But I've reread your original post, and now I think you intend to use one long pipe in each corner, to run the full height of the unit. And you intend to "notch" the pipe in some fashion to enable you to fasten the shelves? How do you imagine that would work?

Perhaps I don't have enough information, and I am not the most experienced guy here by any means. But what I understand you to mean sounds like it will be wobbly and unattractive to boot. The 2x4 "blocks" alone should make it as ugly as homemade sin, but worse, I don't think they'll add much to the strength.
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On Thu, 22 Nov 2012 23:31:33 +0000 (UTC), John Doe

Thats doable. However..you have to figure out how to keep the shelves apart. Wood glue wont do it.
And the best strong and light shelving material is steel.
Just a heads up.
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
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On Thursday, November 22, 2012 5:31:34 PM UTC-6, John Doe wrote:

Sam's club stores sell some pretty simple and strong metal shelving units under the brand "Gorilla". We have four units in our basement and one in the garage. They are similar to heaver industrial shelving we used in our factory. Pin and slot assembly and the only tool needed for assembly is a hammer. Size is 4' wide x 18" deep x about 7' tall and the last unit we bought was around $65.
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On 11/25/2012 7:42 PM, RonB wrote:

Lowes has some nice wire shelves in various sizes from $55 to $75 You can by four wheels for 5/wheel.
I suspect that Home Depot has something similar.
By the time you take the time, buy the wood and 2X2? you will have at least that much in it.
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