stanley #8 jointer plane

I picked up a stanley #8 jointer plane over the weekend.
It looks in good shape but the blade needs to be tuned and sharpened. The question is how. I have a slow speed grinder and a tormek. None of the attachments that I have fit the width of the blade
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william kossack wrote: | I picked up a stanley #8 jointer plane over the weekend. | | It looks in good shape but the blade needs to be tuned and | sharpened. The question is how. I have a slow speed grinder and a | tormek. None of the attachments that I have fit the width of the | blade
DAGGS: rec.woodworking "scary sharp"
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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See if you can find a description of Mike Dunbar's scary sharp method, his technique helps with free hand honing. It essentially is holding the iron in front of you at full contact with the bevel edge and moving the iron laterally be rocking your body back and forth side ways. It works!
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Lowell Holmes wrote:

But an edge sharpened laterally is more likely to break off as the scratches are running the width of the blade. Vertical sharpening, with the scratches running the length of the blade, gives a stronger edge.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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When I'm done, there ARE no scratches. Just a glistening mirror finish that looks great in the tool shrine.
You don't want to actually USE those puppies, do you? ;-)
Patriarch
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I didn't make myself understood. You sharpen the iron the normal way. The lateral movement is how you move your arms. I always honed by pushing the iron or chisel away from me and I avoided rocking the iron or chisel by pushing it to the end of the hone.
The method on the DVD that came with my Norton water stones shows how to hold the iron dead flat on its bevel, but instead of pushing the iron away from your body, you rotate the iron 0 degrees an move your arms and the iron from right to left. You do this by rocking your body sideways. The scratches do not run the width of the blade. As with yours, my irons and chisels are polished to a mirror finish.
I think Mike Dunbar introduced the side to side action with his scary sharp method.
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Patriarch wrote:

Now look under a microscope :-).
But another poster pointed out that I misunderstood the technique described. The blade is sharpened in the normal way.
-- It's turtles, all the way down
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A dull plane is a terrible thing, you should not be exposed to it. If you'll send it to me, I'll relieve you of this serious problem.
Old Guy

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the main problem is the end of the blade has been somehow rounded. I'm going to have to remove maybe a 1/16th of an inch of the blade to get a straight edge to then sharpen
Old guy wrote:

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Rounded? Or cambered? It's not unusual to camber, or slightly round the corners of the plane blade, so as not to leave 'plane tracks'.
David Charlesworth describes a simple method for that. Check the hand tool message archives at woodcentral.com
Patriarch
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Patriarch wrote:

Scrub/Jack plane - cambered - sure. #8 joiner? Don't think so.
charlie b
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Christopher Schwarz says to camber a jointer, as does Jeff Gorman. I haven't done it yet, but intend to. :-)
I would say that Lie Nielsen concurs since Schearz is on one of their DVD's and that's one place he said to do it.
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Lowell Holmes wrote:

A #7 & #8 are primarily used for getting the edge a board flat and straight- for edge joining two boards - hence "joiner/jointer" name. Resulting surface doesn't have to be square to the face of the boards - IF the two boards are against each other and "joined" at the same time.
If there's a slight curve / camber in the iron it should produce a slight concave surface. That means not much contact between the two boards being edge glued together - and a very weak joint.
Am I missing something?
charlie b
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I understand your concern. I haven't done it yet. I have an extra iron that I intend to camber and try. Schwarz states in his video that the amount of camber you put into a jointer iron is much less than you put in a smoother. He states that the amount of hollow in the edge (of the glue joint) is barely discernable. I'm not saying it is the thing to do, but just pointing out there are people that do recommend it. I intend to experiment with it. :-)
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Patriarch wrote:

I'll have to look at it again but I thought it was more than just the edges
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On Tue, 17 Jul 2007 21:23:30 -0600, william kossack
Any guesses as to what this beastie is? http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item 0136109538&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT&ih3
My best guess is that someone dropped their #8 and broke it in half. Rather than welding or strapping the mouth as usual, they then moved the handles and frog to the undamaged rear section of the body and cut a new mouth.
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Your cap iron does. Use it as a "jig" with your slow speed grinder by attaching it sideways to the bevel side of your iron, far enough from the edge that you can let it ride across the front of the toolrest.
I hope you're not quenching the hot blade in water. That makes the steel crumbly by shocking it. Better to go slow and "quench" with the air draft from the spinning wheel. You can also press the blade against a piece of flat cast iron, like a tablesaw top. Note that coarse white vitrified bond aluminum oxide cuts coolest. Gray carborundum is meant for mild steel, not high carbon.
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