Sawing Large Pieces on Table Saw

Page 2 of 2  


It would be pretty tough to cut a small strip off the bottom of a door with a table saw unless maybe you had a sliding table or something. I've used a straight edge and a circular saw or jigsaw to do this. (Don't try with a cheap jigsaw, you'll need a high quality saw like a Bosch or Milwaukee, but most any circular saw whould be OK)
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry, The edge guide and circular saw is a winner. A few things to consider though:
Assuming your newly installed floor is level: Draw a line where you need to cut. Use a good square and make sure the line is perpendicular to the hinged door edge, (Less abuse, more likely the straightest) If you know you door is racked or your floor by the door id unlevel, scribe the bottom of the door using an appropriately sized block of wood or a compass(dividers with a pencil on one side).
Make sure you use your straight edge and scribe the line with a sharp utility knife on the "show" side. Use a good sharp blade. If you leave the line you could sneak up on it with a belt sander or hand plane.
Good luck, Myx

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If your interior doors are hollow like ours, wont cutting a strip off the bottom create an opening in the bottom of the door?

We
of
off
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<SNIP>
It depends on how much you take off. For most adjustments there is plenty of solid wood in the bottom rail to trim the door to fit.
Bob McBreen
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the
If it is a hollow core dore than pull that strip of wood out by gently prying the outer layer up, cut the door, and reglue the wood edging. If solid door use the straight edge circular saw route. That is how I cut my new pine doors - use a 60 to 80 tooth plywood blade for a most excellent cut with very little tear out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
40 tooth blade is really too fine more like 30 tooth and use masking tape and cut through the tape or score with razor blade and then cut on right of score line.

plenty
cut
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hollow core doors have solid wood in the ends just for this.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Depends on the door and how much you cut off.
If it's a hollow core door ... there may be only about 3/4 inch of wood along the bottom.
Two solutions: 1) run the strip you've cut off through the table saw to remove the panel on each side, then glue and brad it in, fill and paint. . 2) rip a 2 x 2 to width and insert it.
Easiest way I've found.
Ken
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Clamp a straight edge on the door and use a circular saw. Score the cut line with a utility knife to prevent chipping or put a piece of tape over the cut line.

We
of
off
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I just said that. But I should have read down first. So I have ADHD ! LOL !

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry:
You've gotten a lot of good advice, but no one reminded you of the first rule: "Honey, in order to do that for you, I need a new tool."
The tool here is one of the most handy things you will ever get. I don't remember the name, but someone will help me out I'm sure. The tool is a straight edge with built in clamps. They come in various lengths. I have a long one for clamping on the 4' dimension of plywood and another that spans a 2' board.
Gene

We
of
off
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's called a clamp and tool guide. Made by Tru Grip. You can clap it to the work and attach tools to it and guide them with it. I have a 4-5 ft long one. Works great.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Larry, DO NOT use your tablesaw to cut a door for height. Hopefully you meant hand held circular saw.Take a piece of 1/4" plywood and nail or screw a straight edge to it. The plywood has to be as long as the widest door and wide enough to clamp to door { 10" is usually enough}. Run saw base against straight edge and thru plywood. This will give you blade setting and protect door from scratching by saw base.Clamp this jig to door. Because you are unfamiliar with trimming doors I will show you the safe way to get a perfectly clean cut. Put a sharp combination blade in BACKWARDS in your saw ( 40 teeth in a 7 1/4" blade will do}.Set for 1/4" depth of cut, then make this scoring cut.When done, turn blade around the correct way. Set base so blade will be a full tooth below door, then cut. You do not have to tape the cut or knife it either. Now for those people that are more familiar using a skilsaw, don,t bother putting blade in backwards. Instead start at end of cut and PULL saw backwards with a 1'4" depth of cut. Then set saw base as usual and push saw thru to complete cut. This method can be used to cut veneered panels, laminated doors or anything that is prone to chipping. You simply make a shallow score cut then finish cutting with full depth. Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike, begging your pardon, but I have to take exception to your advice. If you want to "score" something, 1/32" cut is more appropriate; 1/4 is more like the depth of many dados!
dave
mike wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Why not use a nice handheld electric planer? My Makita would make short work of that job....
On Tue, 16 Dec 2003 15:43:42 -0500, "Larry Bohen"

Remove the nospam from my address to email me!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

On YOUR table saw it's probably not a good idea to try (otherwise you wouldn't ask), but i would maybe take the door to the woodworking business a few streets away and have it cut on their table saw, wich is a "real" one with the crosscut sled large enough to cut an ordinary door with ease.
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you use the circular saw, be sure to score the top edge to minimize chipping. A piece of painters masking tape will also help minimize chipping.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

------------------------- Hi Larry, The best way to trim the bottoms of doors may not be on the table saw. It's awkward and possibly dangerous, and the chances of making a mistake are high. I usually use a clamped-on straightedge and a straight bit chucked in my router. Make each cut in several passes to avoid stressing the tool or the bit . Increase the depth of cut about 1/4" after each pass. If you have hollow core doors and you're removing more than 3/4", you may have to replace the material at the bottom of the door (usually a softwood 1x2). Just glue and clamp a new piece in place. You may need to invest in a long straight bit. If you'd prefer not to, you can make half the cut, then turn the door over and start from the other side. An alternative is to use a circular saw with the straightedge. However, as the blade emerges at the top of the cut, it can play havoc with veneers. An 80-tooth plywood blade helps. So does scoring. This involves running a sharp utility knife blade across the door against a straightedge, following the cut line, before you make the saw cut. After you make the cut, sand the edges lightly with a block: this will give you a more uniform edge. I suggest you tackle a closet door or some less conspicuous one first, rather than one which is used frequently. Good luck. John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.