Roll-around toolbox

It's common in a machine shop for a workman to have a full toolbox he moves to his job (on a large stationary tool). Big rollaround carts are the norm.
But this guy has it worked out for his cabinetmaking... <
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WgwmV_qNr_Y

using what appears to be a common Home Depot item, #I-IMCNAT, as his chassis.
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On 1/8/2015 5:39 PM, whit3rd wrote:

While he has a much larger shop than I, it looks like he has his shop set up as I have mine. Everything is on wheels, and can be rolled into the best configuration to accomplish the task at hand.
While not as big, my workbench is on wheels. Under the workspace there area two shelves for tools. In each end of the workbench there are two cupboards where I keep frequently used tools.
The work bench was built to a height that allows me to use it as an out feed table for my table saw. A he workbench. (I make my wife's picture frames so do a lot of repetitive cuts) Pick up the piece, make the cut, and place it down on the workbench, without moving. Other times the work bench serves the same purpose when using the drill press or bench grinder.
At other time it can be rolled in front of the car so every thing is convenient when working on the car.
Since everything is on wheels, If I am working on large or long pieces, I can back out the cars and move the saw and workbench to have the whole garage to accommodate the pieces being worked on.
When my brother and I built a boat in the garage, we moved the saw and workbench up next to the part of the boat we were working on.
It is a very convenient arrangement
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On 1/8/2015 4:39 PM, whit3rd wrote:

also on a smaller scale,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omaAo--jAa8

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On 1/9/2015 10:59 AM, Leon wrote:

Neither are my preference. Especially the SNubs POC.
Both seem a lot inconvienent.. but that's my opinion.
--
Jeff

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On Thu, 8 Jan 2015 14:39:26 -0800 (PST)

I like that and I wish I had the room for it, it's too big for my space. The idea of labeling is good. Even for a one man shop.
I am putting wheels on a metal cabinet I found for $2. The wheels cost more than the cabinet. I like mobile so I can rearrange as needed.
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On Fri, 09 Jan 2015 14:27:50 -0500

I'm still organizing shop. I've been waiting to see how things fall into place and how my workflow fits in.
I'd be interested to hear how others organize/layout their shop. I like to cherry-pick the ones that make sense for how I work.
One thing I've got is a retail-style shelf. The shelves are about 6" deep and 12" wide, height is adjustable. The entire unit is about 5' high and on a lazysusan. It holds a lot of stuff.
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wrote:

I don't see the point in a small shop. Mine is a lot larger (can take the entire ~2000ft^2 basement, if I choose) so something like this may make sense.
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On Fri, 09 Jan 2015 09:59:32 -0600

This video is an ad. Didn't watch it all. It's not easy to watch. At least the big ones are cost-concious this one is not.
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On Thursday, January 8, 2015 at 4:39:29 PM UTC-6, whit3rd wrote:

For some reason you seem to have confused the difference between a mechanic /machine shop and a woodworking shop.
Mechanic shops have numerous bays to work on the vehicles. And many people working in the shop. One might be a bay with a concrete floor. One bay w ith a pit where you drive the vehicle over the pit and the mechanic stands in the pit and works on the underside of the vehicle above. Another bay ma y have a lift where you drive onto the lift and raise the lift up in the ai r and the mechanic stands underneath the lift and works on the vehicle. An d the mechanic shop may have several of each of these bays all with vehicle s in them. And the mechanic moves his portable chest from bay to bay to wo rk on vehicles. And as we all know, in mechanic shops, every mechanic has his own personal tools. No sharing of wrenches and sockets between numerou s mechanics. Everyone owns his own tools and uses his own tools for handwo rk. Mechanic shops do have shared big tools or specialized tools.
A home mechanic working in his garage shop does not need or use a moving to ol chest because all the mechanic work occurs in one spot in the garage so all his tools can be in stationary chests and stay in the same spot.
Woodworking shops have one work area where all the work comes to. The work bench. Not all the work occurs here of course. Wood is cut to size at the tablesaw or chopsaw. Planed and jointed at the planer and jointer. Holes drilled at the drillpress. Edges shaped at the shaper or router table. T he wood has to move from one tool to the next. But lets say all the joints are cut at the workbench. And all handwork such as planing and cutting ar e done at the workbench. After the wood is shaped and sized at the various stationary tools, you take it to the workbench to cut joints. SO, WHY wou ld you want or need mobile tools if all your work occurs in one spot? The workbench. In woodworking shops used by multiple people, the large station ary tools would be shared. The hand tools probably would not be shared and each person would have his own chisels and saws and planes. But most wood working shops are individual in nature. One person owns and does all the w ork in them. No multiple people.
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On Fri, 9 Jan 2015 17:05:31 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

Not buying that one. I have two "bays", each with two ends of a car. I also prefer to have the tools out of the way when not in use.

Not buying that one either. I have several "work stations" for different purposes. Some tools, particularly drills, drivers, and clamps, are commonly used in more than one area.
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I found drawings of most of my tools on Sketchup (using similar ones if something wasn't available, a 6" jointer isn't going to be much different model-to-model), drew things like shelves, and then arranged everything until I found a setup that worked.
Sometimes you can use infeed/outfeed space for multiple tools' infeed/outfeed space. Othertimes you can line up dead space on the tool, like the back of the jointer and side of the planer, to minimize the amount of dead space.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 10 Jan 2015 04:31:43 GMT Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

I don't know sketchup, may have to look. Haven't finished the drywall yet so still in that stage of doing work and finishing the space.
But I'm getting a better idea of where to put things as I go.
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It's worth a look. It took me a couple hours to get to the point where I was able to show someone something I sketched and discuss the details of it. It won't be too long until you stop /using Sketchup/ and start /drawing a thing/.
Plus the basic version (which does everything I need) is free.
Sometimes it's easier to design using 2D methods (Pen and paper, Visio) then import or redraw into Sketchup 3D. If all you're doing is a floor layout, the third dimension sometimes gets in the way.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 11 Jan 2015 21:36:37 GMT, Puckdropper

That's a key distinction with Sketchup. It wasn't until I "got" the idea that it's a 3-D modeling tool, rather than a CAD program, that it all sunk in.

Sure. Sketchup is specifically designed to be a 3-D modeling program. I've run into problems trying to force a 2-D layout.
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On 1/11/2015 4:36 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

I don't use Shetchup much, and find the 3D effect is more of a hassle than it is worth for the drawing that I do.
However the last time I used it I found that I could get a 2d drawing by rotating the "Y" axis so it points directly at the user.
For quick rough drawings it is simpler to use a paper and a pencil.
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