Reaction to walnut

Page 1 of 4  
A friend just contributed a few 3x3x18" of very well aged walnut to my collection. My spouse is having an allergic reaction to the stuff which is currently in the garage. I have wrapped it in a plastic bag to see if that solves the problem. Any other clues as to how to handle the situation.
Len
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

collection. My spouse is having an allergic reaction to the stuff which is currently in the garage. I have wrapped it in a plastic bag to see if that solves the problem. Any other clues as to how to handle the situation.

If you've had walnut around before with no problems, I'd be thinking of a fungus or mold or bugs or similar rather than the wood itself.
I'm not going to advise as to the best way to treat that; people use bleach or wood preservative or heat or whatever and it seems to me there can be risks. Like if you put it in the oven for some hours, your wife's allergies are going to be hit much harder. Or could a chemical be bad for the wood?
I'd try something else besides wrapping in plastic because you may get condensation inside and moisture damage. Maybe wrap it in shellac?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/20/2012 11:50 AM, Len wrote:

a) are you sure it's the walnut, and
b) what kind of allergic reaction?
While there are some who are somewhat allergic to walnut sawdust, it would seem unusual for simply a solid sample to cause such on its own--as another poster suggests, perhaps there's another contaminant in play here.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Len wrote:

collection. My spouse is having an allergic reaction to the stuff which is currently in the garage. I have wrapped it in a plastic bag to see if that solves the problem. Any other clues as to how to handle the situation.

I would helpful to know where/how it was stored before you got it.
If it has already had a chance to out-gas, and it is still a problem, then (as someone who understands your wife's side all too well), I'd give up on it. Theoretically, if you coat it well-enough, you could probably slow the out-gassing to the point where it is not a problem.
Another thought is that you might work the wood and then let it outgas in the garage (or shed, or what have you) for a few months. Then put the finish on after that.
The problem with leaving it in the plastic bag is that it won't out-gas.
I bought some tall audio speakers this week made out of MDF that will make me sweat if I sit next to them (like when I attached the wires). Whether its the MDF, the glue or the finish is inconsequential. I air the house out too. I know from experience that time will heal them. It took me years to start blaming "furniture" for causing physical symptoms (it was just too "ridiculous" of a notion).
After writing all of that, maybe it is more likely that mold or mildew is the problem? I've heard of wood dust being an issue, but I'm not sure what gas that wood has to outgas? I hope my post wasn't a waste of your time.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

MDF contains Formaldehyde.
It isn't very nice stuff.
--
Stuart Winsor

Only plain text for emails
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/24/12 5:47 PM, Stuart wrote:

Not the stuff I use.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You're lucky to be able to find it.
--
Stuart Winsor

Only plain text for emails
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/25/12 2:43 AM, Stuart wrote:

Three big non-chain plywood warehouses within 15 minutes.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stuart wrote:

When I first opened the end of one of the cardboard boxes, the odor was abundant. Of course, Formaldehyde is odorless, but the "new" odor is a good indicator of it's presense. The first 3 or 4 days, I let the house air out. Now, after a week, it's mostly ignorable. In low doses, it gives me a slight shortness of breath, in higher doses it makes me sweat. If I sand and inhale some of the sawdust from such materials, it will put me to bed and ruin the rest of the day. I've performed that experiment twice (being cavalier about it doesn't help!)
I'm hoping for better results from Home Depot's "Purebond" brand plywood which is "Formaldehyde-free". I am currently designing a tv-stand involving it, but I'm still in the paper and pencil stage.
The plywood is veneered (Cherry). If I use a circular saw with a 40-tooth blade, should I expect a lot of ripout of the veneer? It is $45 for a 3/4" sheet. I also have handsaws I can use (maybe too aggressive?) . I was thinking of a design where exposed plywood edges are covered by real Cherry (like inside a dado). IIRC, there some sort of banding/strip that could also be used. Please comment, if anyone is willing to, on the best way to approach covering explosed edges of plywood shelves.
Assuming a 48" long stand (holding an approximately 50-pound tv), and a 15 pound audio receiver, etc., I'm assuming 3/4" would be suitable for the top and bottom and 1/2" for the shelves. Does that sound right? I think a tv stand is a good place to start for a beginner (like me)! It would be easier with even a cheap TS, huh? But I expect not much better results than if I use my circular saw. I don't expect one can plane the edge of veneered plywood. Is that right?
Cheers (& sorry for such a long post..) Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, October 24, 2012 7:51:37 PM UTC-5, Bill wrote:

You know, I have "sworn off" Home Depot plywood 3 or 4 times during the past couple of years. Yet, I keep returning for another frustrating experience. These experiences range from the cheapest C-D ply that seemed to warp in the bed of my pickup on the way home, to a couple of sheets of more expensive Oak and Birch veneer plywood that proved to be so full of hidden voids that my finger went through the surface while working with it.
My most recent experience was a sheet of Birch that looked pretty good on the "good" side. My wife and I lifted it off of the stack high enough to see the other side and actually saw some pretty nice grain in the shadows of the stack, so we slid it off onto the cart. When we got it home (35 miles from the store, there was an obvious "dent" that came and went across much of the width of the sheet on what was the bottom side. This was due to a void in the layer beneath the veneer that extended across the sheet. The ply was used for a garage cabinet so I didn't make the 70 mile round trip to return it but I WILL pay the 20%-30% higher price at a closer lumber yard next time.
You truly do get what you pay for.
RonB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RonB wrote:

couple of years. Yet, I keep returning for another frustrating experience. These experiences range from the cheapest C-D ply that seemed to warp in the bed of my pickup on the way home, to a couple of sheets of more expensive Oak and Birch veneer plywood that proved to be so full of hidden voids that my finger went through the surface while working with it.

"good" side. My wife and I lifted it off of the stack high enough to see the other side and actually saw some pretty nice grain in the shadows of the stack, so we slid it off onto the cart. When we got it home (35 miles from the store, there was an obvious "dent" that came and went across much of the width of the sheet on what was the bottom side. This was due to a void in the layer beneath the veneer that extended across the sheet. The ply was used for a garage cabinet so I didn't make the 70 mile round trip to return it but I WILL pay the 20%-30% higher price at a closer lumber yard next time.

I don't dispute that you get what you pay for, but I suspect you can't get a sheet of Formaldehyde-free plywood at your favorite lumberyard. I'm in the "desperate" stage--I'll spackle it! : )

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bill" wrote:

--------------------------------------------------
Make your circular saw cuts 1/8" proud then bring to size with a straight edge and a router with 1/2" straight edge. ---------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------- Standard veneer tape designed for the purpose using either a heat gun and roller or a clothing iron.
Trim to size with router bit designed for the specific task. ------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------- NO. Use 3/4" through out and band front and back with 3/4"x1-1/2" stock for the shelves.
Even then you are pushing the design. -----------------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------- Why not?
I've built similar things using a Bosch 1587 jig saw, a router, a straight edge(Aluminum angle) and some C-Clamps.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

Thank you very much for your suggestions (I printed them out)!
I'll post a sketch after I make one. I browsed Google's images of "TV Stands" yesterday, and was suddently overwhelmed. Cabinet doors on each end would be nice... : )
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

Lew,
I'm not sure whether I understook what you meant by "band"-ing the front and back. I tried to, but at this point, I don't think I have captured it in my design (I just posted a picture of it on my site):
http://web.newsguy.com/MySite /
I sense I'm not doing enough to prevent a collapse from "wracking" (and I think your "bands" may be related to that). I learned from my drawing that it's a few inches too deep too. The ends are (too) square. This is just my first shot at it; I started right after I read your earlier message. I still need to add doors on the sides and more shelves to make the space on the ends usable. I think I should problably drill holes too, so I have adjustable shelves. Maybe a Masonite back?
Comments are always welcome!
BTW, in case LarryJ is keeping track, I don't really own a cable box anymore. But these days you never know what might take it's place. I have a clock I can stick in there.
Cheers, Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wow, fancy! That's a newfangled 'rectangle' thang, ain't it? ;)

Yes, drill holes for adjustable or removable shelving. Notch them so the shelves don't slide front and back. This makes them fit over the pins, hiding them, as an added benefit. I'd use 1/4 or 1/8 ply for the back.

Biscuit the verticals, leave a reveal top and bottom, make the shelves end 2" short of the back and drill 3" holes top and bottom for ventilation and cord access.

Alright. You're forgiven, but only if you turn the power off to it occasionally, so the 12:00 flashes constantly. <wink>
P.S: Use the proper colored wood so you don't have to smear RBS all over the poor dear. Waterlox is a clear, simple, durable finish. Prefinish by taping glueable areas with 1/2" tape.
P.P.S: By banding, he probably meant this: http://lumberjocks.com/topics/38701
-- The ultimate result of shielding men from folly is to fill the world with fools. -- Herbert Spencer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bill" wrote:

----------------------------------------------------------------- What's that old saying about a picture being worth a thousand words?
Your maximum unsupported span is 24", not 48".
Big difference.
The "banding" I referred to was a 3/4"x1-1/2" piece under both the front and back edges of a 48" long shelf.
Not your situation so not necessary.
Lay in a piece of 1/4" ply into top,bottom and side rabbets to prevent racking.
This creates another problem: Ventilation.
Easiest way is to make shelves 2"-3" shorter than sides and cut some ventilation holes in the rear ply.
Use shelf pins to support shelves and make them adjustable.
Rockler has a good gage. Ping Leon for the one he uses.
Get a couple of 10" flat bastard files and use them to trim excess veneer tape.
Less chance of damaging 3/4" ply cherry veneer.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

IIUC, That will definitely reinforce those upright pieces (in lieu of a dado cut). It seems like with all of that reinforcement, the omission of biscuit joinery can reasonably be omitted. It won't be a problem if I only finish the explosed sides, will it (I think if it were a simple piece of solid wood, there would be a concern)?
I have several pages of notes and I definitely learned a lot from this thread!
BTW, It seems like a few feet to stand on (8--2 near the end of each vertical), might help protect the unit from the "overzealous" vacuuming that occasionally occurs here. My inclination is they would need to be attached by several bolts going through the plywood (or a more sophisticated method). Please correct/advise concerning feet.
Thank you all again for the lesson (s)!
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, definitely omit the omission as you planned. Repeat after me: Bisquicks are good. Bisquicks are good. Bisquicks are good.

Heathen. Finish everything. It's good policy. It's also easier to dust and clean.

The above musings don't appear to confirm that, Wee Willy.

Double bottoms are common. It helps to lower the center of gravity and 1.5ish inches of meat to screw legs into. Double-ended lags are common for legs.

Jewelcome.
-- The ultimate result of shielding men from folly is to fill the world with fools. -- Herbert Spencer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/25/2012 10:12 PM, Bill wrote:

To stiffen up that casework you posted a model of, capture your vertical dividers in dadoes instead of using butt joints with biscuits.
Also capture the ends of the top and floor in dadoes in the top and bottom of the end panels ... that will strengthen the casework further, as well as hide the ends of those components.
(When you really must stiffen this type of casework to withstand hard use, drill holes and glue in dowels into each of the joins, thusly):
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopEuropeanStyleKitchen201102#5679345191725374850
Dowels can a contrasting wood in an attractive pattern if need be, or the casework top can be an secondary wood, with the real top attached to it.
This method is an example of an old cabinetmaker's principle used to build casework that will not rack of sag that, paraphrased, goes like this:
"If a case part joins another at a corner, dovetail it; if one part meets along another's length, use multiple through tenons."
You can get much the same effect with dadoes and dowels, or use loose tenons, thusly:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/MSBDTCase3.JPG
While you're in the planning stages you may want to contemplate using a separate top of primary wood, and putting the unit on a frame base, perhaps slightly smaller than the actual casework foot print ... you will likely find that sitting the casework directly on the floor, as drawn, is going to be unsatisfactory in the long run.
--
www.eWoodShop.com
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

I see now that you were either being kind or being sarcastic by your use of the term "casework". : )

Yes, I liked that idea as soon as I read it.
I also like the idea of building a base frame--slightly smaller than the bottom, and floor-levelers.
I had been reading about biscuit joinery today, but now I see you prefer dadoes for the verticals over butt joints done with biscuits. I suppose you would attach cabinet face frames with biscuits, and use biscuits also to help align the bottom to the base frame, huh?
BTW, my wife told me today that she would prefer I make a new coffee table first. None of this will be wasted, however. I could use biscuits to afix some drawer frames to a coffee table. I could not of even written that statement a week ago, so I'm making progress! : )
Cheers, Bill
P.S. I'll probably work on the TV-stand first anyway. Relieved to find out they don't cost $1000 (like the jointer and TS I showed her at Grizzly), I sort of have her budgetary approval for a biscuit joiner--lol. I know she didn't know what I meant, but I told her I wasn't planning to buy a green one.
P.P.S. Something that has been troubling me the whole time I've been working on this post, but I didn't bring it up, was the fine line between a board fitting ornot fitting into a dadoe grove, particularly since I'll probably be cutting the grove with a router. Is there a decent fix for if the dadoe is cut just a little too wide? I know shims would look tacky, but no one would see them anyway and that would work, right? :) When you distribute "a little wide" over 16 inches or so, it doesn't seem like too much. Maybe I should take my humor over to David Letterman' Show? It's late.. :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.