Re: Preparing a roast - best way?



Go to a real butcher and get a forerib, get at least 3 ribs or it will fall apart. Sear in a really hot pan all over to colour then cook as per your butchers instructions which should be dependant on your oven. Test 30 mins from end of cooking time and let it rest for at least 30 mins before carving. Plus, do not overcook. Pink meat is fine, brown cardboard is not!
Adding carlic around the beef and propping up on half onions is my favourite trick to ensure good airflow and even cooking. Also I rub in loads and loads of salt, mustard and coarse black pepper. Sometimes a little ginger for a twist.
If you go to a proper butcher you should be able to get well hung meat from a decent supplier. I recently had some of the best meat I've tasted in years from ... http://www.wellhungmeat.com/ not much us unless you are in the UK though :-)
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" snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com" wrote:

It depends on the cut of beef. Cheaper, tougher cuts are good as pot roast, which can be done on the stove, though I think that once the meat is seared and the broth added it is better cooked in the oven. A good cut of beef should definitely be done in the oven. You can roast the vegetables in the pan with the roast, but they can also be roasted in a separate pan. Cut them into appropriate sizes so that they will cook in the same amount of time, rub them with a bit of oil and season with salt and pepper. Good gravy and Yorkshire Pudding should impress them.
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you can go to www.google.com and look up recipe sites. Just about anyone will have some recipes for pot roast. you can add what ever you want to it. I have seen a recipe for a Salsa Roast. My husband doesn't like traditional pot roast.
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On 14 Jan 2005 09:40:43 -0800, " snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com"

This will depend upon the cut of meat you choose to prepare. The most tender cuts are usually best dry-roasted and those that need slower and moist cooking to tenderize them are usually best "pot roasted."
What cut of meat did you have in mind?
Boron
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On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 12:47:01 -0500, Dave Smith

I regularly entertain guests with a roast beef dinner.
1) Buy a decent roast. Get a prime rib roast with two ribs. Smaller roasts don't cook as well. A five pound, two rib prime rib roast will feed up four to six people as long as everybody doesn't really pig out. Get a small wire rack to raise the roast about 1/2" off the bottom of the roasting pan.
2) Get a meat thermometer. Insert the tip until it's in the middle of the roast, but NOT touching any bone. Put in the oven on the wire rack in the roasting pan at 320.
3) If you're going to make roast potatoes, before you put the roast in the oven, cut up the potatoes about 2" square and bring to a boil in a pot in the stove top. Simmer for 10 minutes. Arrange them in the pan around the roast and put everything in the oven. As the roast is cooking, turn the potatoes every 30 minutes. Cooking time approximately 2.5 - 3 hours.
Cook until the meat thermometer indicates your desired doneness, rare, medium, well done.
If you want to make gravy, you can get the type that you make in the drippings of the roasting pan on the stove top after you take the cooked roast and potatoes out, or make the type done in a pot on the stove top. Both types taste good, the type done in the roasting pan tastes, better.
Extras - Garlic bread, a bottle of dry red wine (two might be needed), salad and some type of desert. Store bought pie and cooked in your oven, (it can cook while you're eating) or something like black forest cake, also store bought.
All of this cooking is rated as easy.
Enjoy!
When you master this process, I'll give you some desserts to make. :)
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Ok, these are just my opinion so if someone disagrees, please don't jump all over me.
In my opinion, it depends on the cut of meat. A good cut can be dry roasted in the oven. A less tender cut can be moist roasted in the oven.
Stews are done on top of the stove.
For a good cut of beef roast eg. sirloin tip, rump. Place in a shallow roasting pan on a trivet with about 1 inch of water in the pan. Bring your oven up to 500* and place the roast in the oven for 30 minutes. Reduce the heat to 275 and continue cooking for approx 1 1/2 to 2 hours depending on how rare or well done you wish the roast. I use an instant thermometer and find 45* internal produces the roast I like. You may wish it up to 65*
To moist or pot roast a less tender cut you need to use a covered pan and more liquid. I'm not much into pot roasting so can't help further.
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I thought this is a woodworking site maybe your roast turned out like a wood filler
wrote:

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What Kind of Roast?
What is the cut of beef?
Dimitri
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alphageek wrote:

I make standing rib roasts all the time. Pick one up that weighs 4-6 lbs if the 4 of you have good appetites. I carve the meat along the level of the bones , dust all the surfaces with non-salt lemon-pepper, Nichols Garden 800-422-3985 (http://www.nicholsgardennursery.com ) makes the best that I've found (http://www.nicholsgardennursery.com/store/product.asp?pf%5Fid82&dept%5Fid "&mscssid=J1058XE1ELQ39LATH7RM8XA7PLX6C2W2) and place the meat back onto the shelf of bones. Then sliver elephant garlic and insert it into holes every 1 1/2" around the top and sides of the meat. place the meat on an rack in a glass roasting pan with a single layer of 34" think slices of new potatoes and 1/4'd yellow onions surrounding the meat. Cook the meat in the oven on the center rack for 12-15 minutes per lb depending on how over cooked you want the meat. After resting for 30" the edges will be med with the rest going rare to very rare at the center if you cookk for 12"/lb. At 15"/lb the meat will be well on the edges and med rare at the center. Save the drippings for the yorkshire pudding, recipe to follow.
Mix well: 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt 6 large eggs 2 1/2 cups milk
If the drippings are less than 3-4T add 1/2 stick of butter - NO margarine.
Fold into drippings - don't "mix" REPEAT.... Gently - swirl into the drippings in pan, don't over-mix. Cook 425F 20 min
The top of the pudding will stand proud of the pan by at least 3 inches, get a picture, you won't believe it. DON'T keep looking, this is much like a souffle, it'll fall afterwards, but you can ruin it if you get too eager.
The Yorkshire will cook in the time it takes for the meat to rest.
Enjoy, and if you have any questions, give me a yell, Dave in Fairfax
--
Dave Leader
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