Planer or Jointer for a hobbyist shop?

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On Tue, 11 Mar 2008 16:33:23 -0400, Leuf wrote:

Don't know if you're aware of these:
http://woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid 591
but I did a lot of cussin' until I got them. They work like a charm.
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On Tue, 11 Mar 2008 16:36:52 -0700, Larry Blanchard

Mine has a cam at the back for adjustment. Getting it tightened down and still be in the same place, that is where the fun happens. I think there was one bolt that it just didn't want to slide at and that made it fun as well. I think it is a runout issue at this point rather than any alignment problems.
I need to get a shop that is either a) on the ground floor b) in the house I'm going to die in, before I get a heavier saw than I already have now. And it will be a while before either of those things happens.
Am thinking about getting the sawstop contractor's saw whenever it comes out though. I don't need any more power, just a more precise machine.
-Leuf
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I just went through about 2 full days getting my Craftsman saw aligned. At least the blade aligned with the miter slot. No matter what I did I just couldn't get within about .020". I had to completely disassemble the saw and do a little filing to slightly elongate the holes that attach the trunnions to the table top so I could have a little more adjustment room. I made a set of "PALS" out of an old piece of heavy duty angle iron I had laying around and put them on the rear of the saw. Seems like I should have put them on the front because I still couldn't get it to align within about .010". So I made another set for the front. Bingo. I just finished that yesterday so I hope that it stays this time.
Now the fence. ugh. Bent and bowed.
Wayne
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I havent bought any lumber from them yet. I only know what they offer. Any work I have done I used 4s from HD...which can get expensive. I want to use better wood for the same bd ft price I am paying for poplar....I do have an older table saw, but like I said I can cut fairly straight with a circular saw and jig. I know I will need both eventually, I just dont know which to do first until I get the "permission" again for another piece of equipment. I plan on making a panel saw, so cutting long sheets on a table saw wont really be an issue. I am more concerned about my hardwood needs for faceframes and glued up panels. My only real experience so far with glue ups is a couple cutting boards I made from scrap. At the time I had my dads jointer working(it died and is OLD), but I used a beltsander and orbital sander for the tops as needed. But I realize for quality work I am going to need better bigger equipment. I have tried jointing with my router, but i have a cheap ryobi table at the present(one of my projects it to build a better router table) and it doest work really well. I am really anxious to get my girls' blanket chests done, cause that could be the open to another piece of equipment....hehe. I just want this purchase to be 'right' incase its a while till I am able to get the next piece of the puzzle.
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depictureboy wrote:

I used to have that same Craftsman 8" saw. It was finicky, the fence was a POS and working with the saw became a nightmare.
Read up on past posts in here about what one should get first in power equipment. Also read up on articles, shop setting up books, craftsmen's books, and almost unanimously they'll advise getting a decent table saw as one of the very first pieces of machinery.
Get Kelly Mehler's Table Saw book and you'll find that the saw is an extremely versatile machine.
Tanus
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On Tue, 11 Mar 2008 00:32:38 -0400, Leuf wrote:

I do own both a planer and a jointer. Since I got a decent bandsaw for resaw and a thickness sander, the planer doesn't see much use.
I don't get tearout on a thickness sander :-).
And a good tablesaw with a good blade can joint edges with a sled. But I do need the jointer for those really nice looking boards that aren't flat on either face.
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Based on the projects you list, a table saw will serve you best. But that is because most of the projects you list don't really need flat boards. Or they are narrow and short boards so you can cut out the twisted part easy enough. Blanket chest does need reasonably flat boards but you can likely get away with less than perfectly flat boards. S2S just means the board is smooth on both sides. It can and will still be twisted and cupped. Unusable for larger furniture projects or if you are trying to glue up panels. Or use longer boards. As I mentioned, you can cut up a twisted and cupped S2S board so the final short, narrow pieces you use will be fairly flat and OK. A jointer makes one side of a board, or edge, flat and straight. Then the planer makes the other side parallel to the side you made flat on the jointer. Run both sides through the planer and you end up with a thinner, but most importantly, a flat board with no twist or cupping. Usable board. A table saw can sometimes put a straight and smooth enough edge on a board for gluing up. But I'd run it over a jointer before gluing. Either electrical or human powered jointer. You can also use a human powered plane to get one side of a board flat enough to run it through an electrical planer to get both sides flat and smooth. You don't need the whole side of a board flat for it to work in an electrical planer. Just flat enough not to rock when pushed down by the rollers in the elctrical planer. And you can run boards on edge through the electrical planer after going through a table saw to get an edge reasonably straight. So an electrical planer will likely be best for you if you already have a table saw and know how to use a human powered plane.
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"If" you buy rough stock for your materials, you need a saw,planer,jointer.
"If" you use mostly sheet goods and buy dressed material, you need a saw and "maybe' a planer.
In my opinion, "all" shops need all three power tools to be effective.
A LOT of folks get by without a jointer but you have to learn to work around the wood, which can/could be a pain in the ass.
depictureboy wrote:

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depictureboy wrote:

Almost all of the wood that I have purchased at the big box stores is supposedly all dimensioned. But in reality, the thickness of their lumber varies a little. One board may indeed be 3/4" thick, but the next may be 13/16" thick. This difference makes face frame edges ragged, and it takes a lot of work to clean up the glue line of edge glued boards. Lumber that I have purchased from hardwood suppliers is a little more consistent within species, but 4/4 lumber is more like 13/16" or maybe even 7/8" thick.
Since there are ways to finagle around getting edges straight, I think I would vote for the thickness planer first, and then convince SWMBO that the jointer is a companion tool. Gotta get bofum. :-)
Wayne
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NoOne N Particular wrote:

Well, actually you need the band saw to go with the planer, and then when you see the kind of edges you get out of the band saw that sells the jointer.
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depictureboy wrote:

...
I'd go for both, meself... :)
But, it's probably more effective to go the planer route next as there are relatively easy ways to get the straight edge w/ what you already have, but finishing to uniform thickness and/or after glue-up is much simpler w/ a planer.
That then raises the question of the size of panels you're likely to want to run through -- the only real disadvantage of the 12-13" portables (for other than real heavy stock of course, for which they're not suitable).
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Start by upgrading your table saw, then buld a sled so that you can joint the edge of a board using the table saw. Odds are that you can beg borrow or steal the use of a planer when you need it by providing a set of new or resharpened knives to the owner. That frees up space and resources.
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