Planer or Jointer for a hobbyist shop?

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Well, building a cabinet for my water softening system has endeared my wife to let me get a piece of heavy equipment. I know a tablesaw is important, and I have my dad's old 8" craftsman, plus I can cut pretty straight with a circular saw(or some jig if needed). I also have a hitachi 12" for crosscuts..Now I was looking at getting the dewalt jt360. But now I am thinking that maybe a thicknessing planer would be better. Some of the project I plan on tackling in the near future include:
Blanket Chests for my daughters. Shop Cabinets(plywood or PB Melamine) Face Framed Office Hutch Book Cases for the office
etc.
Most of the hardwood is coming 4/4 to 5/4 from a local dealer(not a big box homecenter) so even though its s2 its not s2 like you get at lowes or homedepot. So what should I be looking at?
I have a Ryobi router and table, Hitachi miter saw, old craftsman table saw, and a circular saw. I was really focusing on the jointer before I got the OK, but now I am unsure which is the more effective route.
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Honestly, I would get a good table saw. That's your workhorse, the tool you turn to first. I owner a DeWalt 735 planer and I still get my rough-cut planed at the dealer. A planer really comes in handy when it's coupled with a bandsaw (for re-sawing). A jointer is nice, but a good table saw in indispensible.
Jeff
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Depending on how the finances are..........or if SWMBO gives you a blank check and says go have fun...check out this link below. It is both and IIRC Popular Woodworking gave it a thumbs up. FWIW it is available with a spiral carbide cutting head. Might last a hobbyist a lifetime. The individual carbide cutters each have 4 sharp sides. You hit a nail you turn one or two inserts and start cutting again. I am still in the dreaming stage but hey might as well dream big. Good luck Lyndell
http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-Jointer-Planer/G0633
http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-Jointer-Planer-w-Spiral-Cutterhead/G0634

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On Mon, 10 Mar 2008 17:10:23 -0700 (PDT), depictureboy

A thickness planer becomes important when you need wood not sold in your area. For example, 1/2" wood for drawer sides. A jointer is used much more often in my shop and is important when using the table saw. You can get by without a jointer, but not without some effort and skill. What you need depends on your project and from what you have given the jointer gets the vote.
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I have both, and rarely use either, and tempted to sell both! If your wood is poorly planned, then maybe a planner would be a better fit for you. A jointer is really not needed unless you are edge gluing large panels. Face frames you can get true enough on the table saw. Like on other post stated a good table saw is a must, with a good blade. I tend to cut my wood to size and just give it a good sanding. In my opinion, you need to do allot of wood working to justify the price of a planner or a jointer, and you can do very nice wood working without either of them. If money is no problem, then I retract my statements! Greg
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Yes the table saw is the work horse and prob the best dollar spent BUT lets not forget the Fence System

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Planer, sometimes you need 1/4, 3/8. 1/2. and or 5/8' thick stock.

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On Mon, 10 Mar 2008 17:10:23 -0700 (PDT), depictureboy

Well if you are buying s2s from a lumber yard, how are you getting your first straight edge currently? There are many ways of doing so, but there are just some things that should be easy and getting a darn straight edge on your board is one of them.
I still don't own a planer. I do have a drum sander though. There are a lot better ways to make a board thinner than to turn it into a mountain of chips. If you are buying s2s and you don't really have that much of a need for thinner stock, and from your project list I think that's the case, then I don't see the need at this point.
So the question would be are you happy enough with how you're getting that straight edge now, or would the money be better spent elsewhere?
-Leuf
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I have a jointer, have had a jointer for about 25 years. It is much easier for me to put a straight edge on an 8' S2S boards using a simple jig on my table saw than using the jointer. One pass is all it takes. My jointer is fine for short stuff but for get it on athe long stuff. I hardly ever need to joint short stock.
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Leon wrote:

You mention you barely use it. Why do you feel it isn't necessary? What is this simple jig you have created?
It seems that in most projects a jointer would be handy, but there is always that guy out there saying he has had one for X number of years and never uses it...
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I feel it is not necessary because I can turn rough cut lumber into flat and straight s4s lumber using only a table saw, planer and 2 jigs. To straighten a board I use a jig that is simply a 14" wide piece of 3/4" plywood 8' long. I screw 2 toggle lever clamps on to it near the right side along its length. Lay my crooked stock/rough cut stock on top of the plywood and clamp it down with the clamps with only a minimum amount of the boards crooked edge hanging over the blade side edge of the plywood. Set the fence so that the saw will cut off that crook edge and run it through. This is great for s2s lumber. There is also a jig I use to flatten rough cut lumber up to 12" wide using my planer.

A jointer works well if you have a large jointer or only want to straighten short stock. Otherwise the TS jig is very cheap and faster than a jointer.
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On Tue, 11 Mar 2008 09:40:44 -0500, "Leon"

If the edge is really nasty I'll just take a couple passes at the jointer, get it good enough to run through the TS. Rip the opposite side, then bring in the fence a bit and run the first edge. However on my TS I just can't get a clean enough edge for a perfect glue line, so it will then go right back to the jointer again. I don't usually have to go through all that with the s2s hardwoods, but the rough cedar I get is nasty. Rarely do I deal with anything longer than 4'.
And I am NOT messing with those trunions again, you hear me? Every time I do it's just 6 hours of cursing to get it back to where it was before I started. Someday I'll get a cabinet saw, until then it is what it is.
-Leuf
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"snip>

My Delta CS with a Forrest blade will make glueline rips. Maybe you need to look at your blade.
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On Tue, 11 Mar 2008 21:34:30 GMT, "Lowell Holmes"

And see that it says Forrest on it? I'm getting identical patterns of marks on both sides of the cut so it aint the fence alignment either.
Actually I was getting better results from my Ridge Carbide before it needed sharpening. I want to see what it does when it comes back compared to the Forrest to see if something has gotten worse with the saw. Gotta get round to shipping that out one of these days...
-Leuf
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Leuf wrote:

Presumably there are washers on the fasteners that hold the trunions. If you ever decide to mess with 'em again toss the washers and get new ones. The old ones may have deformed just enough to make it difficult to make fine adjustments.
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wrote:

Yeah, and I am using a cabinet saw and I am sure that will make a lot of difference. Idon't blame you for not wanting to readjust the contractors saw. If is did that once, I did it a bunch more times. When will a manufacturer simply put in a miter slot that is adjustable inside a larger slot?

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Well I went ahead and ordered the Ridgid TS2400L. I stopped by HD last nite after work(I always liked looking at that saw), and noticed the ridgids have lifetime service agreements for part and labor...I just couldn't look back after that. So I will probably get the thickness planer next and between my router and TS Ill get a straight edge.hehe. I did do some more reading on how to joint an edge with the router, so ill keep practicing. And it looks like there is a way to hang a router off the slideing deck on the TS so that might fix my cheap router table issues.
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Actually if you do a Google search and go for Jointablilty, this is a straight edge tool that has been around for a while that lets you use your router, freehand, to put a straight edge on a board. IIRC about 200-300 dollars but much cheaper than a jointer.
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rockler has something like that too...thanks for the info
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