Notching posts

Building a deck and I have the need to notch some 6x6 cedar posts that I can slide a 2x6 in from the side. I don't think can use a Dado blade on my radial arm saw, so are there any other ideas that would make this easier?
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wrote:

Well, first off, most radial arm saws *will* accomodate dado sets, so you might want to check into that a little further. Why do you doubt that you can use one on yours?
Anyway, even if you can't put a dado set on your RAS, you can achieve the same effect by repeated crosscuts. You can use the saw to remove all of the material, but it takes a while. I'd make one crosscut at each end of the dado, and one about every 1/2" to 3/4" in between, then chisel out the stuff in between.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I probably built at least 300 modules out of pine one by stock on the radial arm saw.
Almost all of them had dadoes. All of them were cut on a radial arm saw. Each module had at least ten dadoes. some of them over fifty dadoes. Figure about 4,000 dadoes says you can cut dadoes on a radial arm saw.
I have also cut dadoes in a wide variety of other stock, including 6 X 6 stock.
I prefer a good stack dado set over the wobble type. Just remember to nibble at your cuts. Big dado cuts can end in disaster. Easy does it. Take it slow and easy. Be patient and pull the saw slowly through the stock.
The radial arm saw is made for exactly this kind of work.
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HotRdd wrote:

Multiple cuts, about 1/4" apart, with a hand held circular saw set to the proper depth. Knock out the remaining waste with a hammer and clean up with a chisel. It ain't fine furniture.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Timber framers do this all the time with a circular saw & a wide chisel. They call it card decking.Set your saw to the exact depth of the dado then two careful cuts at each side of the dado, then repeated cuts about 1/4-1/2 apart, then hit them a glancing blow with a hammer. Most of them will break & you can push them out with your hand. Then clean it up with a chisel & hammer using it bevel down. ----- Original Message -----
Newsgroups: rec.woodworking Sent: Tuesday, September 04, 2007 4:36 PM Subject: Notching posts

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Putting the dado set on the RAS would be easiest, but you could always use a router or multiple passes with virtually any sort of saw.
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Sorry I haven't tried putting the dado in the saw yet I just assumed that it wouldn't work. I have the 12" dewalt sliding compound mitre saw so I guess I'll pull the blade out and see if the Dado will fit. Unfortunately I only have the "Wobble" type of dado.

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skill saw is best as other posters stated, set blade depth then cut ur marks then repeated cuts between marks...as many as u want, then snap off pieces with ur hand. pull back blade guard...BE CAREFUL!!! and use the saw to "sweep" between marks using the blade to clean out remnants. Done it lots and it works faster than a chisel with about the same result...it ain't a piano!
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OK, here's a note to which you should pay very close attention:
A Compound Miter Saw IS NOT a Radial Arm Saw, despite their similarities.
A compound miter saw is NOT designed for dado work.
A radial arm saw is.
Back to your regular programming.
Patriarch
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wrote:

Then you do NOT have a radial arm saw.

And a dado set very likely will indeed NOT fit, and you should NOT try, even with a wobble dado.
Best bet then is the multiple-crosscut procedure followed by hammer & chisel, as described several times by myself and others.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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"HotRdd" crazy talked this

YOU DO NOT HAVE A RADIAL ARM SAW!!!
Putting dadoes on a little, baby sliding compound miter saw is suicidal!!
One is a big saw on a stand that takes up a whole wall of the shop. The other is a little, portable saw that you can throw in the back of the truck and drive it to the job.
Get your terms right. There will be a considerable reduction in guts and gore if you don't confuse these two very different machines.
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Settle down, I have both saws. One stationary int he shop and the Dewalt portable one. Though I question whether the Dewalt one is worse thatn the craftsman 10" one in the shop.
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If you want something really............exciting!, in the '60's Craftsman sold a dado set designed to be used on a 7 1/4" circular saw. I have the catalogue from my dad around somewhere but I can't find it right now.
wrote:

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Wow. BIG difference between a sliding compound miter saw and a radial arm saw. Don't try a dado on your SCMS - of course I assume there is no way it would fit anyhow.
Dave Hall

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For framing jobs like this the field expedient is to make a series of kerfs with your hand held circular saw, blade set to the proper depth (1.5" for 2X lumber), leaving thin (maybe 1/8") ridges of wood that can be knocked out with a hammer. If necessary clean up with a chisel or rabbet plane.
--
There are no stupid questions, but there are lots of stupid answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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(Larry W) wrote:

.. using a speed square as a guide to make sure that the end cuts are straight, and square to the faces ...

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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