Newbie Table Saw Safety Question

Page 2 of 2  
Leon wrote:

Solar water heating can provide a substantial savings in many areas. It can be difficult to find someone to repair/maintain them. I've tried to avoid solar water heating for exactly that reason.
I haven't tried to track the photovoltaic panel developments very closely. As of the last time I took a serious look they were still fairly pricey, weren't anywhere near as efficient as they needed to become, and (if my understanding was correct) they produced less and less power as they age.
Here in Iowa, most farm homes are heated with either #2 heating oil or propane. As the price of #2 goes up so does the price of propane - and the level of stress and hardship seems to expand almost exponentially for people already struggling to keep the family farm operating. The panels I'm producing aren't suitable replacements for the more conventional heating systems; but a good installation can significantly reduce (by 1/3 to 2/3) the amount of fuel burned by #2 and propane heating systems.
And unlike solar water heaters and PV systems, the passive air heaters only need the same maintenance as windows - keep any exposed wood painted and wash the glazing when it gets dirty. Stuff that almost all homeowners can do for themselves.
I'm neither an energy expert nor a "mother-earther"; but I've been tinkering and experimenting with low-cost passive panels for more than thirty years now (and have enjoyed working with wood since I was a small fry). When my digital systems development consulting market imploded, I decided to switch my focus to solving the cost-of-heating problem for as many people as I could. I'm enjoying it.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That seems to be the problem with systems such as this. I got pricing somewhere and a system to handle my needs would pay for it self in about 10 years. With deminishing effeciency that could equate to never. On another note, I watched my house being built back in 1981 and have lived here since. I replaced the original electric water heater last September. I bought a top of the line Whirlpool. Comparing the energy usage of it and my old unit indicated to me if my old unit was operating at peek effecency the new water heater would pay for itself in 3 years. I watch my electricity usage like a hawk and have done so for the last 12 year or so. Anyway since the month that I installed the new water heater every month except 1 has resulted in less electrity usage. In the last 9 month I have used 11% less electricity compared to the same 9 months of the previous year and up until that point my usage was increasing at about 2 or 3% per year for the last 4 years. Now I figure the new water heater will pay for itself in another 9 to 12 months.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You kept all the scale off that old water heater's elements? If not, your figures are skewed. Old was at its worst, new now at best. We just replaced ours, and it was amazing what the old elements looked like. As cheap as they are, I think it might be worth replacing the lower every two or so years.
Best energy saver I've found are drapes. Up here the coldest days are the clearest, so the drapes open to collect heat. Closed now against the same. Wonder what effect the new low transmission glass would have, though.

lived
and
year
itself
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

your
Scale nothing, in 2 years time the water heater would fill with lime and calcuim to the point that the element could be pulled out after unscrewing it. My was a single element that was long and curved. I suspect this kept the water from circulating properly and it effectively worked like a 10 or 15 gallon unit with a 50 gallon heating element. In the end It was tripping its internal breaker monthly. I kinda had suspitions that theis was part of the problem but never realized that it was costing me an additional $13 to $18 per month.

same.
I live in Houston TX, so cold is not a real on going problem. I do have storm windows and realized a 10% reduction in my electric bill right away after they were installed 10 years ago. But, this was a $5,000 investment vs. the $300 water heater investment. I doubt that I wall see a savings fron the windows considering theri cost. We appreciat the storm windows more for having a quieter house, no dust on the window sills, and no drafts near the windows anymore. I recently built a storage building in my back yard and used radient barrier decking for the roof. It is amazing that the closed up room does not get any hotter than the outside of the building. That cost me an additional $24 over the regular cost of plain plywood decking. Additionally I did not use tar paper behind the siding, I used Tyvec which is a woven plastic water barrier that permits air travel one way. This does not get hot like the black tar paper will and has no odor like tar paper does. That cost about $50 more than regular tar paper.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Texas? Limestone country. Sounds like you should be a twice-a-year flush versus annual.

two
kept
tripping
of
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well all that my water is on a softener now and the build up is 99 % better.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"philly45" wrote in message

That menacing look is a good thing, as it definitely demands respect. However, and considering one is used for non-through cuts that can almost always be safely handled with proper techniques, push blocks, and sacrificial fences, a dado stack may be statistically less dangerous than a regular blade.
For dadoes and grooves in casework I almost always use a dado stack, if for no other reason than the time factor involved over using a router. And it may well be worth considering that a relatively dangerous operation that can be done in less time and with less effort, and with the same amount of safety consciousness, ultimately means less exposure to the danger, particularly when performing repetitive tasks with woodworking machinery..
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 7/10/04
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Semi-newb here... I recently used my router table for dado and rabbet work. The results were great. I will continue to do them in this manner. It did feel a bit safer, but I bet a router injury would be just as painful as a TS injury. The safest accurate way is probably with a dado plane.
I suspect the vast majority of people who use a TS and stack for dadoes do so because of the TS fence and weight. I've used a stack for dados too, but my stack was a cheapy and now is dull.
I haven't made a hand held router dado jig, but I would make a double sided one so I won't ruin a board if it drifts. I am interested how everyone measures dado locations. Do you measure to the center, top, or bottom of a dado? IE How can you get precise shelf arrangement top to bottom?
SS
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13 Jul 2004 06:52:30 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Sam Schmenk) wrote:

router injuries tend to involve the rapid conversion of chunks of flesh into hamburger. DAMHIKT.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 13 Jul 2004 01:14:07 GMT, "philly45"

Use feather boards to hold the work piece in place and use push sticks. Stand off to one side while pushing the work piece through.
Thunder
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.