New table saw - can't change blade

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gray asphalt wrote:

Not unless you do it yourself, no.
More than likely some Borg doofus turned it on w/o having fully tightened the arbor nut or checking that it wasn't only finger tight--that'll run one one extremely tightly for sure(+).
But, it won't be tight enough to have stretched the shaft bolt sufficiently to do any damage, no...
If'en the supplied wrench isn't long enough, use a bigger one :) or block the locking one and use a hammer to apply a shock to the nut a la an impact wrench...
(+)Once upon a time when just a young lad (relatively speaking, of course :) ) in a hurry I thought that would be the quick way so did just hand-tighten and go...well, it wasn't time well saved given the time required to undo it later... :( Lesson learned, however...
--
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Nix the heat idea, It could weaken the shaft (lose temper) causeing more serious problems in the future, like a broke shaft with a spinning blade on it.
Joe M.

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When I realized one of the wrenches kind of slipped into a slot that held it in place and put a lot of pressure on the other wrench, it came loose. Thanks for the advice. I was being too careful and your posts convinced me to give it a real strong application of pressure.

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On Thu, 10 Jun 2010 07:51:29 -0700, "gray asphalt"

Put some Liquid Wrench along the nut and give the area a few taps (on an area that wont be damaged) with a small hammer. I'd call Ryobi customer support first--their solution is probably best. You may have a damaged thread.
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On Thursday, June 10, 2010 9:51:29 AM UTC-5, gray asphalt wrote:

I have the same issue except that I change the blade one time and now I can't get the darn thing off. Tried for about 2 hours still no success. Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
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For sure you loosen the arbor nut in the direction that the blade spins.
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wrote in message
On Thursday, June 10, 2010 9:51:29 AM UTC-5, gray asphalt wrote:

Got a heat gun? Aim it at the nut and the end of the arbor and let it heat things up for a while, until you don't want to be leaving your finger on it for more than a moment. Put your two wrenches on the arbor and the nut, brace the arbor wrench with the heel of your hand, and tap the nut (in the correct direction!) with a mallet or a hammer. Use a brass hammer if you've got one.
Once you've got it off, take a look at the mating face of the nut to see if it's been galled from over-tightening. If so, touch it with a small flat file if necessary to take off any proud metal, then flatten it on a piece of sandpaper or crocus cloth, using the table as the backing surface. Afterwards, as an occasional maintenance task, give the arbor threads and maybe the face of the nut a fingertip wipe with some anti-seizing compound. It's not a lubricant, so you don't need to worry about it causing the nut to loosen.
Tom
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in

Removing a stuck nut goes a lot easier if you've got a wrench or socket that's tight and won't slip. Often the stamped "wrench" that comes with the tool is a sloppy fit.
Sometimes turning the nut the opposite direction helps. It's not just about left-hand threads, but sometimes tightening the nut a tiny bit is enough to get things moving.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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"Puckdropper" wrote in message

Not sure the OP, gray asphalt, is still with us here on the rec... ;~)
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It looked like he found his problem described in a 4-5 year old post and was hoping to find a solution.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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"Puckdropper" wrote in message It looked like he

It's amazing how some of that old stuff floats to the surface again... I find stuff I wrote back in the early 90s on BBSs, and documents I posted to FTP sites, floating around on the www to this day. I remind my sons that anything they put in social media may outlive them! LOL
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On Sat, 3 Jan 2015 10:07:41 -0800, "tdacon"

Actually it IS a bit of a lubricant - but I oil my threads and the nuts still don't come loose.
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You might be applying oil to the wrong place. Are the arbor threads rusted? You might apply a light film between the arbor nut and flange washer.
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You misunderstood. I said I oil mine all the time and never have a problem with the nut coming off by itself - and also never have a problem taking the thing apart when I need to.
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Gotcha. And you should never have an issue with the nut coming off by itself, arbor nuts are self tightening with use. On the flip side of that, I have never oiled the arbor nut on any of my saws and never had a problem with removing the nuts.
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I would say that's an expected consequence of regular use. If you routinely remove the nut (to switch from crosscut to rip or dado set, etc) then corrosion and gunk never collect on the threads, so they work as intended.
In the OP's case (the post from 2010) I'd guess Ryobi uses air wrenches in their factory, and likely the nut was crossed and the assembler just ran it up that way, not being able to feel it wasn't right.
John
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On 1/4/15 9:46 AM, John McCoy wrote:

Gotta be careful with the sawdust on that arbor. Once spark and BOOM!!!
--

-MIKE-

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Hard to say, there is no rust anywhere in the nut or arbor. Perhaps better quality of steel.

I'm sure Ryobi does use air wrenches but I'd would be very surprised if they were not calibrated to the correct torque.
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Maybe he cut some oak you know that oak rust is bad.
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On 1/5/15 1:14 PM, Markem wrote:

Oh yeah! I forgot about that darned oak rust. That's a double-whammy. I think he's going to have to just throw that summbich away.
--

-MIKE-

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