mounting a ceiling air filter

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I have a JDS air filter/cleaner which I want to mount in my shop (I also have a dust collector). There's not a lot of info out there on positioning, and some of it is contradictory. Grizzly recommends mounting it diagonally in a squarish shop (which mine is), toward one corner. The shop may not be big enough to matter, but any advice would be appreciated.
The TS is central. The lathe is perpendicular to the north wall. The BS and planer and jointer are on casters, and can go anywhere.
One factor I want to be careful about is that (a) the shop is inside the house, and (b) there is one air return in the shop, directly above the door, which is in the SE corner. I can't figure out the best arrangement for positioning the air filter with respect to the air outlet.
Thanks,
Andy Barss
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On Mon, 21 Jun 2010 01:19:22 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Barss

I'd mount it over or near whatever makes the most dust or since many of your machine tools are mobile, over the area where you usually use them.
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Dust, not chips.
There's some mileage to putting it near a router table, or workbench, because that makes fine dust. A table saw makes coarser stuff that falls by gravity, or is sucked up by the cyclone (most workshops need a cyclone before a ceiling filter).
Mine's currently near the lathe, because lathe sanding throws a lot of dust, and it throws it high. I also have a downdraught sanding table to deal with finishing work at source.
Mostly though, don't put it near the door to the outside, or anywhere near a draught. No point in trying to clean up the great outdoors.
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wrote:

I know this is never done, but if you RTFM you'll see that it warns not to put it near the "exit path" or something of a machine.. Best protection IMHO is: A good mask.. (do as I say, etc.) A DC to get as much as possible before it gets to the mask.. An air scrubber to get the fine stuff that the DC misses..
Followed by going over the shop with a 2.5" hose connected to the DC before the wife complains.. (My shop IS in the house)
mac
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The concept was flow in the room. It draws air through it and will work the room better that way. Creating side currents.
Straight on might leave voids of dead air.
Temp mount it and do a smoke test. See how it draws a smokey pot from all parts - find dead parts - rotate or move and test again.
I'm sure they had to defend their stance that it worked and proved the use.
Test yourself. It is in your best interest.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net "Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
On 6/20/2010 8:19 PM, Andrew Barss wrote:

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On Mon, 21 Jun 2010 01:19:22 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Barss

Best place for me is with the intake end in the center of the room with the exhaust end pointed towards which ever wall is farthest from it.. Either end too close to a wall or corner messes with the whole shops airflow..
Keep in mind that you don't want the intake near a machine, that's what the dust collector is for.. The air filter is for what's airborne..
mac
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On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 23:08:08 -0700, mac davis

Good point. Shows what I know about air cleaners.
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On 6/20/2010 8:19 PM, Andrew Barss wrote:

Mine, the same one you have, is mounted 7' up and mid way between my workbench, where most of the sanding is done, and the miter saw, which kicks up the most fine dust ... both being about 5 feet apart.
That said, sanding dust is no longer a problem with two Festool sanders and, Festool CT22e Dust Extractor. :)
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Gee....thanks for the "drive by"....
I'm still on my old 5" ROS tied to that super quite Crapsman 10hp shop vac..
Swingman wrote:

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LOL. My super quiet Craftsman is in the attic, being super quiet and unused. Seriousely the Festool Vac is quieter than the sander. The absence of dust is the only indicator that the vac is actually running.
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Now that you are actually using those sanders it should be easier to remember that you have "2" of them. ;~)
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On 6/22/2010 8:13 AM, Leon wrote:

LOL ... yep, was so excited using the TS75 plunge saw for making everything but gumbo, that, even though it was duly reflected in my official shop tool inventory, I'd plumb forgot about buying the RTS 400 EQ back in December ... until I discovered that "extra" systainer the other day??!
It be Christmas deja vu, all over again, in June ... :)
Good thing, cause I really needed it at the time.
Now, I really see an overpowering need for the DTS 400 also, to complete the threeO ... don't care to ever own/use another make sander. :)
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Have you used the track saw to cross cut cabinet grade veneered plywood and if so, how clean was the cut? I'm wondering if I can use one of these track saws to occasionally replace the table saw with a 60 tooth carbide blade?
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On 6/24/2010 12:58 PM, Upscale wrote:

Answered this before, and maybe even posted pictures for you(?), but yes. cabinet grade plywood is what is routinely cut with my TS75, and up until recently with exceptional results an A1 grade stock.
That said, and after cutting a lot of utility plywood with it in the interim, I did dull the blade by hitting an embedded drywall screw the other day and noticed that the cut quality had indeed degraded slightly.
That can't be blamed on the saw, and this was in a rift sawn oak, A1 plywood that has had a notoriously brittle veneer in the past that is even prone to splinter a bit with a Forrest WWII. Hell, it splinters if you drag an assembled cabinet across the work bench or floor before it's been stained/finished.
I'll simply use the blade in question henceforth for utility and rough cuts only.
... it's wise to do that in any event.
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If you did answer for me, then apologies for repeating myself. The only thing I'd have to decide is if I want to get the TS55 or the TS75. I'd be using it for sheet goods only and sincerely doubt I'd need the extra depth cutting capability of the TS75.
The only considering being is the larger saw (weight and handling difficulties from a sitting position) and the larger blade of the TS75 which would have several more teeth on it giving a slightly smoother cut.
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On 6/24/2010 9:28 PM, Upscale wrote:

I felt like I needed the extra cutting capacity, and it turns out I was correct in that.
There is substantial difference in weight ... about 4lbs, IIRC. In your case, and particularly just wanting a saw to cut sheet goods, I suspect the 55 may be the better choice in saws
Leon was recently on the fence with the same issue you face. Might want to ping him and see his reasons for choosing the TS75 as he generally gives these things a good deal of thought and consideration before leaping, and rarely goes for size alone.
You will definitely be tickled with whichever one you buy. :)
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wrote:

How do you cut sheet goods from a seated position? I'm not constrained to a seated position, but I'm also not all that damn stable when standing. AAMOF, I was replacing the screen door to the patio a while back and ended up on my back with the door on top of me! Not the kind of flailing I want to do around the TS.
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On Thu, 24 Jun 2010 20:10:23 -0700, "Lobby Dosser"

Very carefully. I use a wheelchair and have to work with what I've got. Cutting up heavy sheets goods such as a 4x8 sheet of plywood is extremely awkward for me. Often for safety's sake, I've had to use a hand saw or jig saw to cut down sheet good to make them less unwieldy. It takes time and effort,things I hate wasting. That's why I'm considering the track saw. And since my table saw resides in a friend's garage, I only get to use it in Summertime and there's nothing like an infeed or outfeed table for me to use. The good thing is that my friend can help me ~ when he's there.
Frequently, I get the whatever store I order plywood from to pre cut some of it for me, but they often charge for that service and won't/can't cut to exact size. I have to get them to cut oversize and the cuts they will do usually have splintered edges all to hell. A track saw could put much of that control back in my hands.
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OK, that answers that one. Thanks. :(

By 'track saw' you mean the Festool, right? How will that help?

I may have to use SWMBO as a push stick. :()

Yeah, that's pretty much what you get around here. They'll do one or two cuts free and the rest at $0.50 a cut, but only to the nearest 1/2 inch and it's a crap shoot whether ot not you get someone reasonably competent on the panel saw. NTM whether or not the blade is in decent shape.

I'm thinking about building a panel saw for sheet goods. So far it's the only way I can think of to safely cut them by myself. Though I may try some lightweight sheets through the table saw first. It was two years before I allowed myself to drive due to my loss of reaction time and I've yet to face the table saw. Astonishing how much of what you do goes on outside the brain.
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On Fri, 25 Jun 2010 00:45:37 -0700, "Lobby Dosser"

I have plenty of requisite strength if needed, but for me, it's all about reach, or lack of it in my case.. A panel saw type of apparatus would be suitable. Basically, something to hold a sheet of plywood upright solidly, but several inches off the ground. Essentially, it would be a panel saw without the saw part and I'd be adding the Festool track saw to the party. Being able to lean down and up gives me 5' or more of cutting reach which would be great for 4x8 plywood.
I suppose I could also lay a sheet of plywood flat on an table or something and use the tracksaw, but not being able to lean over it, I wouldn't have the reach to cut 4' across the sheet. At the very least with 4x8 wood, I'd be cutting half, going around to the other side and pulling the saw the rest of the way. Not all that safe and not great for splinter free edges.
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