Maloof finish instructions

We used General oil stain to get the buffet to the right color. Sanded to 220 in prep. Ready to apply four coats of Maloof oil/poly finish then two coats of the oil/wax topcoat. Instructions say to sand to 400 then use 000 0 steel wool in prep. Will the 400 degrade the color we've applied? Also, the can is silent on sanding between coats.
Larry
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Have never used Maloof Finish over stain, but have used it quite a bit down throughout the years. I generally sand to 320, and do not sand between coats of the Maloof finish as there is absolutely no need to do so.
I would want to make sure that the stain is absolutely dry before applying the first coat, so you may want to test the combination on some project scrap first to see if it causes any dissolution of the stain.
FWIW
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On Wednesday, May 8, 2013 9:13:19 PM UTC-5, Swingman wrote:

One more question, Karl. Can I apply this with a foam brush? Can says to use cotton cloth.
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On Wednesday, May 8, 2013 10:47:18 PM UTC-5, Gramp's shop wrote:

Often, I find applications using a foam brush applies a thick coating of fi nish. Generally, you don't want to apply oil finishes too thick.... the su rface will dry/skin over, before the rest/inside dries/cures. If an oil is applied thickly, the inside may not dry properly and/or seems to almost ne ver dry, depending how thick and if thee are areas of "pooling". You want to apply an oil finish in thin coats, hence the cloth applicator is more of ten used or is recommended to be used.
Maybe, if you use a foam brush to apply, use a dry brush to remove any exce ss, hence, thin coat applications. Kind of similar to applying oil stains, apply and wipe off any excess, so it dries properly. The pooling effect o f too thickly applied oil stains usually has drying issues, doesn't dry pro perly or may not dry at all (gumming, remains gummy (for sanding) for a lon g time, etc.).
Thick applications of anything are more prone to developing drips and runs, also.
Sonny
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On Thursday, May 9, 2013 12:32:33 AM UTC-5, Sonny wrote:

surface will dry/skin over, before the rest/inside dries/cures. If an oil is applied thickly, the inside may not dry properly and/or seems to almost never dry, depending how thick and if thee are areas of "pooling". You wan t to apply an oil finish in thin coats, hence the cloth applicator is more often used or is recommended to be used.

s, apply and wipe off any excess, so it dries properly. The pooling effect of too thickly applied oil stains usually has drying issues, doesn't dry p roperly or may not dry at all (gumming, remains gummy (for sanding) for a l ong time, etc.).

Agreed. The can says to apply liberally with a clean cloth, then remove th e excess with another clean, dry cloth. It cautions that several cloths ma y be required to remove the excess. There are a couple of places where the face frame abuts the interior where I want to have a clean line, hence the brush versus rag approach.
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I'll add, read the directions! Contrary to what you have indicated about a foam brush and an oil finish, General Finishes, Arm-R-Seal offers both a rag and or a quality foam brush to apply the product. This product is oil based.
I have had excellent results with applying a thin first coat with a rag to seal the wood and a single additional relatively thick second/final coat using a "Wooster" foam brush that I get at Lowe's.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8380785705/in/set-72157630857421932/lightbox/
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On Thursday, May 9, 2013 8:01:08 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

rag and or a quality foam brush to apply the product. This product is oil b ased. I have had excellent results with applying a thin first coat with a r ag to seal the wood and a single additional relatively thick second/final c oat using a "Wooster" foam brush that I get at Lowe's. http://www.flickr.co m/photos/lcb11211/8380785705/in/set-72157630857421932/lightbox/
Probably the result of my poor application techniques. I rarely use a foam brush, more so a bristle brush, when brushing. I spray, mostly.
I've been known to (hand) apply too thick of oil coats and have seen others , DIYers, do the same. I had understood Larry's question from the perspect ive of someone's (my and similar others') approach, who don't always pay cl ose attention to these sort of applications, especiallly when I (we) don't brush oil very often.
Thanks for the better explanation and guidance.
Sonny
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On 5/9/2013 10:58 AM, Sonny wrote:

foam brush and an oil finish, General Finishes, Arm-R-Seal offers both a rag and or a quality foam brush to apply the product. This product is oil based. I have had excellent results with applying a thin first coat with a rag to seal the wood and a single additional relatively thick second/final coat using a "Wooster" foam brush that I get at Lowe's. http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8380785705/in/set-72157630857421932/lightbox/

DIYers, do the same. I had understood Larry's question from the perspective of someone's (my and similar others') approach, who don't always pay close attention to these sort of applications, especiallly when I (we) don't brush oil very often.

That chest was the first time I had tried finishing with a foam brush and I was quite skeptical too but the test piece worked out good.
And I did not mean to indicate what you were saying was totally wrong and in this case the foam brush would not work per the instructions on that particular product.
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On Thursday, May 9, 2013 1:41:44 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Nary an adverse thought crossed my mine. Just a good exchange of info from respective experiences.
Sonny
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Much easier to wipe on with a cloth. Use two cotton cloths, one to apply with, and the other to wipe. After each application and wipe down, spread the wiping cloth out in a safe manner, then use it as the application cloth for the next coat.
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Again ... Use a cloth to apply the Maloof finish. There is NO advantage to applying this product with a brush of any kind, NONE.
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