long slots in small wood


I want to make a folding bucksaw, a bit like the one shown in
http://www.poleandpaddle.com/images/pack_saw.jpg . But that means that I need to cut a slong slot in both the uprights and the crosspiece, to cover the sawblade. I do not own a router or a tablesaw.
Is it possible to do it with a circular saw? Any other suggestions? I've thought of gluing up three pieces of wood, but that feels like cheating.
/Par
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Par wrote:

that looks like an ideal cut for a tablesaw. I'd suggest that you find someone with a tablesaw you could use for the cut.
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If you can get some boards of the same thickness on either side and clamp it all together you should be able to do it.
-Leuf
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gatherer.org says...

You can clamp your tablesaw to a table upside down and set up an independent fence for cutting your slot. You could use a bisquit jointer if you have one.
Or you could go with the 3 bits of wood solution - I would seriously consider it and not think it cheating at all: you'll probably end up with something stronger than 1 single bit of wood with a slot. I cut my hammer handles out of 5-ply (homemade) stock, for instance - they last several times longer. Make it a feature and use different coloured hardwoods :-)
-P.
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What type of glue? This thing is bound to get wet regularilly (canoeing and general wilderness travel) and also used in rather cold temperatures (down to -40 C is likely).
/Par
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gatherer.org says...

Urea-formaldehyde (the clear new Gorilla glue is pretty fantastic) or resorcinol in that case. PVA and aliphatic glue cannot handle getting wet regularly.
-P.
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Peter Huebner wrote:

???? I can't find anything about a clear Gorilla glue, and there's no obvious mention of it on their Web site.

FWIW, Weldwood doesn't recommend their urea-formaldehyde glue for uses requiring complete water resistance, for that they recommend resorcinol-formaldehyde.

Some of the modified aliphatics can take quite a lot of water exposure. Titebond III has passed some fairly stringent tests. Wouldn't recommend it over resorcinol though.
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