Leaving Air Compressor Full

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While that is all quite true, I'm not sure I see its significance to a discussion of the behavior of water vapor when compressed to ten atmospheres.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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"SWDeveloper" wrote in message

Besides DFTT, look up the verb "cavil" ... it may help you understand why you are basically engaged in pissing in the wind.
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I have a 2 HP, 20 gallon Craftsman compressor. I drain it about every five years and never release the pressure at the end of the day.
I have been using it since 1973.
It was getting really hot when shingling so I changed the oil last fall. Don't know if that helped--maybe I just slowed down a bit. :-)
-Doug

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If you lived anywhere near the coast your compressor would have filled with water in a couple of years.
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I think that depends both on 'how near' and 'which coast'.
scott
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Drain any condensation out after each use but there is no reason why the tank can't be left pressurized.
--
Make it as simple as possible, but no simpler.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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Larry W wrote:

You'll have to go back and drain it again after the tank cools down. There will be more condensation as the cooler air can't hold as much moisture in its gaseous state.
And as others have pointed out, there's draining condensation and there's draining the tank completely. If you'll go back to drain the condensation after the tank is cooled, there's no reason why you couldn't leave it pressurized. If you're not willing to do that, you may well end up with rust eating the bottom of your tank out over time.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com
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Buck Turgidson wrote:

I leave my own compressor full, and know of some that have been full for 15 years. <G>
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On Thu, 26 Apr 2007 19:50:21 -0400, "Buck Turgidson"

Maybe. When you drain it do you see water? Water (and oxygen) will rust the inside of the tank.
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In general, no. However a machine that has a slow leak down somewhere and is going to be switched off for long enough to empty itself is usually best vented deliberately rather than being left to do it inevitably itself (or just fix the leak!)
You should of course always blow down the water after any sufficient use of the compressor. This doesn't mean emptying the reservoir though. Nor does it require doing if the reservoir has been left full long-term with the compressor off, except possibly if you've had major temperature changes.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Why is that?
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It's like a Ni-cad. Let it get too empty and you can't fill it again.
scott.
(That there's a joke, son.)
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A compressor is a pressure vessel, i.e. it's potentially dangerous if left pressurised. The risk is small, the convenience and energy saving of leaving it full outweighs this if we're going to come back to it later and use that stored pressure.
However if we've got a leak, or we're leaving it for a long time such that we're _not_ going to benefit from that stored energy, then good practice is to not leave it lying around. You don't know what it's going to do, but it ain't going to bake you a cake. There's also the risk of leaving the compressor powered up (and leaking), which is just a sizable waste of energy.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Sounds pretty anal to me.

Agreed on that one.
What if it takes my compressor a week or two to drain down, so there's a sizable change I might use the energy? If I have half left, I use half as much enegery refilling the tank.
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wrote:

Leave the tank pressurized and shut power off to the motor.
The normal failure mode of a tank pressurized within specifications is to develop a pinhole leak, not to explode catastrophically. So there is very little risk in leaving it pressurized. Understand that is not the case if the failure is due to overpressurization. In that case, the failure can be catastrophic so make sure the pressure relief valve is properly set and functioning.
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Tom Veatch wrote:

I do.
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But does it take more energy to fill the second half than the first half?
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Yes
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I'll never know, because I leave it full and switch it on when I need it. Sometimes the motor starts, other times it doesn't.
I sleep well, too! <G>
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I have a 6 gallon pancake compressor by Porter Cable. When I use it it's only for an hour or two. Afterwards, when I bleed it I see water coming out of the tank. So I bleed it after each use. It only takes a few minutes to compress the unit so it's well worth the effort. So my recommendation is, if you see water coming out when you bleed the tank, then bleed the tank whenever you are done using it.
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