Jig to perfectly split sonotube on tablesaw?

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Tim Witort seemed to utter in (Tim Witort) wrote:

I settled on a design and we have almost finished splitting all of the Sonotubes. The jig I ended up making was a 16' long piece of plywood 18" wide as the jig base. Onto this was attached a movable "fence" that also went the 16' length. For the 16" diameter tubes, the jig fence was placed 8" from the edge of the jig base. The tubes were clamped to the jig fence at both ends, then the jig was run through the tablesaw with the saw fence set at 18". This gave us very straight, quick cuts. Then we rolled the tube 180 degrees, used a framing square to confirm that the first cut was rotated directly above the next cut. Clamped again and ran through the second cut. I used a feather board to keep the jig against the saw fence and roller stands on the infeed and outfeed to support the jig.
Thanks for everyone's input!
-- TRW _______________________________________ t i m . w i t o r t _______________________________________
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On Jun 5, 5:18 pm, tim snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Tim Witort) wrote:

I think your ideal is the way to go, but instead of wedges use tall fences on either side. I think you'll find the wedges would have to be very big in order to "wedge" the tube. Where as the tall fence will hold tube in place.
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The simplest jig would be a piece of plywood cut to length and ripped the exact diameter of the tube. Firmly attach to the tube and run the plywood against the fence. Flip the assembly end for end for the second cut.
You may need a helper and some type of feather board to hold the plywood and tube tight to the fence.
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I would check to see if the Sona tube makers can rip them first. If not I would use it as an excuss to buy a Rikon 14" bandsaw, and for the largest or all if the excuss idea didnt work is the use a jig saw with straight edge clamped. . Look to see if theres a co-op workshop to rent shop space and use there bandsaw.Where are located maybe someone knows of shop space
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You've got the right idea with the V-jig. You can make it large enough to handle your largest stock and it will work for all of them. Here's a trick to keep the tube from twisting... Make the jig extend at least a foot past the blade on your tablesaw, just run it through the saw to create a kerf, then us a slim piece of metal standing in the kerf behind the saw. The kerf in the tube will go on either side of the metal and prevent the tube from twisting.
I use a smaller setup just like this to split dowels.
Jack
On Thu, 05 Jun 2008 16:18:45 -0500, tim snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Tim Witort) wrote:

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Tim Witort wrote:

The problem is the lack of a reference face.
You make a long-plank-with-V-Seats and clamp it to the tube. You now have a composite object with a nice reference face to run against the fence.
Cut, flip end-for-end (so the reference is still against the face), do the other cut.
BugBear
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