Ink under Shellac

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I've got some special wood (that came from an old tree near our house), and would like to add an inscription on it. With a regular ink pen or a sharpie, the ink will run. Any suggestions for something to add an inscription and still use shellac?
Puckdropper
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On Apr 28, 1:40 pm, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Oddly, I've done just this last week - would have provided photo's but the item has gone now.
I used a Bic Biro pen (but I suppose any ball-point will do), scrawled what I had to on it, let it dry properly (doesn't take long), then *dabbed* a layer of shellac over the inked parts, and dabbed further out, letting the shellac fade - feathering? Not putting more shellac on the pad, just letting it run out, if you like.
When this had dried out, I applied the shellac as normal. It seemed to work OK for me. No doubt someone with more experience (this is the only time I've done this) will be along soon. Obviously it'll pay you to experiment with an off-cut first!
Cheers & good luck.
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David Paste wrote:

Use an engraving tool fill script black or very dark polish , flat back till flush then over polish with your shellac
Use a fountain pen with walnut stain is another technique i have seen used
If your going down the ink path use black indian ink and do a test patch first on a bit of scrap
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Would spray shellac or lacquer do the trick ?
I would think laying down a spray would not smudge any of the writing.
On 4/28/2011 10:29 AM, steve robinson wrote:

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I'll have to try that. One sample last night didn't appear to run, just lost a little color. Thanks!
Puckdropper
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The padding method didn't smudge the ink too badly, but it's still not what I was looking for. Maybe with several tries, I could get something acceptable (I just used a regular ball-point.)
Maybe a light spray of shellac would work better.
Puckdropper
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On Apr 30, 10:02 am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Could be. What would you use to spray it with? I've never really sprayed anything before (other than scratches on a car with a rattle can!)
I suppose one of those little airbrush kits from an art shop won't be too much. I'd love to see how this turns out - might have to try it for myself in the week.
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I've got a cheap air brush and a small spray booth. It's an external mix that uses a lid and siphon tube set up, so if something doesn't work all I've got to do is clean those parts.
The trick is getting the paint mixture thin enough and clean enough to spray. I'll probably have to thin down the 2# cut of the Sealcoat and strain it.
Shellac is available in a spray can as well, but probably wouldn't be economical in quantity.
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper says...

Look for a paint marker. They come in a variety of colors, widths, and tip shapes, in oil, water color, acrylic, and probably other chemistries.
An office supply place (Staples, etc) will generally have white, and maybe silver or gold.
A craft store (Michaels, Jo-Ann, etc) will generally have more colors and one or two brands.
If you've got a Dick Blick near you <http://www.dickblick.com they'll have a wide range of options.
Another option would be to use an artists' brush and whatever paint you like.
A third option would be to get some inkjet decal paper and make a decal.
Whatever you go with, test on a scrap before you commit your good wood.
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Duh... winning!
Yeah, paint marker pens. They used to be very popular for junk yard car parts. Once they dry they are bullet proof. I have always used the silver as it shows up well on everything. Yes, they have them at Michael's Craft stores. Technique: Buy, kind of pump the tip to get paint flowing. Use like a pen. Put cap on pen. Wait 6 months to use again. realize the pen has dried out. Buy a new one and repeat.

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*snip*
If the paint marker is fine enough, it'll probably work well. I don't have a lot of room to write (about half a business card lenghtwise), so need something that'll give me a crisp line.
What about gel pens?
Puckdropper
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On Thu, 28 Apr 2011 22:26:15 +0000, Puckdropper wrote:

One thing I didn't see mentioned was the "archival" pens. I've used them but only on top of a finish, not under it.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in

The gel pen didn't work. Maybe it needed much longer to dry (they're usually smudge free within minutes), but the alcohol took it right off.
I'll keep going down the list. I'll look at paint markers when the stores open in the morning.
Puckdropper
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On 30 Apr 2011 09:05:31 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

2 more thoughts: have a branding iron made (depending on how many of these you're doing), or borrow a pyrographic pen set from a buddy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrography The pens and tips are much smaller than soldering irons allowing for deft and dainty moves.
-- Ask not what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive... then go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive. -- Howard Thurman
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

PD:
I've done calligraphy on paper and engraved in rock. My count of trials with wood is one. It worked fine but I didn't use ink out of durability concerns in the location.
You haven't said what kind of letter forms will be involved in your inscription. That would specify qualifications. If you have a wood surface that won't have bleeding considerations from the grain and want block letter forms, look at the metal nib pens with permanent ink. Just don't make the mistake of pressing harder than you have to. Covering text rendered with them and said ink should be easy.
Otherwise, if sun exposure isn't a threat and your wood is softer, try the fiber (marker) calligraphy pens. Once dried, shellac sealing ought to work, though since ink compositions vary by manufacturer, trial is sensible.
The paint pens I've tried didn't boast crisp line definition. Maybe better models deny that. If you find them, an announcement would be welcome.
A professional effort wouldn't be exorbitant. Call your local art-supply store or art support group/association and eventually you'll have names.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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Puckdropper wrote:

Write *on* the shellac. 1. couple of shellac coats 2. sand with fine paper where you want to write (for tooth) 3. write 4. couple more coats of shellac (if you want)
Note: don't use ink that alcohol will dissolve.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
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DO:
Smarter.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey

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Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

It's easy to burn it in and there are cheap wood burning kits from HF among other places, some just a few dollars. If you have a soldering iron you can use that. Do a little practicing on scrap first.
--
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation
with the average voter. (Winston Churchill)
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What I've done is to print whatever it is, on paper with a laser printer, then cut out and "glue" the paper down with the finish. The paper usually becomes transparent when soaked in the solvent, but you might need to play with some scrap wood and different papers in case it shows through. Laser printing is a must as the solvents in most finished will cause ink jet printing to bleed. Yet another way is to use the special transfer paper made for making printed circuits. You print on the paper with a laser printer or copier, then use an iron to transfer the image.
On Apr 28, 7:40 am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

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