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Carbon tet is a cumulative liver poison. Dad used it often enough to get small stains out. Died at almost 93 from brain atherosclerosis and its consequences (bad).
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Han
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Many of thee toxins are stored in human fat tissues. Year later when you lose body fat they are released and bingo, liver failure.
My boss from years back worked in motor repair and claimed they used to "bathe" in the stuff. It never hurt anybody he knew. Within two sent3nces he talked about so-and-so dropping dead for some mysterious reason...LOL
We have been through some nasty chemicals. Internet and safety processes brought about by unions has helped a lot to create awareness.
Carbon tet is a cumulative liver poison. Dad used it often enough to get small stains out. Died at almost 93 from brain atherosclerosis and its consequences (bad).
--
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Han
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Exactly, it is a dose effect and fat storage of poisons is also important. Release upon starvation does at times become important. Dad's liver was fine until the end ...
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Han
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I decided to join you at Google U. Sadly, we ugly Americans seem to spell it as we will, refer to it as we will. While I was able to find a few odd references to the usage of "y" in the mix, the "e"s and "i"s seem to be used even in the sites owned by suing attorneys with wild abandon.

Not so. When attending Google U classes, you must read as much material as you can stand. The dry cleaning agent used widely by the industry in the 30's (benzine? benzene? benzyne?) fell out of favor, but didn't disappear.
In fact, small shops found it to be a cheap and effective method of cleaning, and apparently used it until meeting OSHA goals became impossible.
From I L Feitshans Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205.
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Regulatory History of Benzene Exposure in the U.S.
*********** The first evidence of risk from acute or chronic effects for exposure to benzene was recognized in 1900 (13). According to OSHA, "the benzene-leukemia link was first identified in 1897 in a report on the leukemia death of a worker occupationally exposed to benzene" (14). Winslow recommended a 100-ppm exposure limit in 1927 (15). Benzene's long regulatory history began in 1934, when Massachusetts established a Division of Occupational Hygiene in its Department of Labor and Industries (16) to investigate benzene toxicity. Based upon reports by Bowditch, Hunter, Mallory, and Elkins (17), it set a "maximum acceptable limit" (MAC) of 75 ppm, which was soon reduced to 35 ppm. In 1946, the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) recommended a threshold limit value (TLV) of 100 ppm for benzene, which was lowered lowered to 35 ppm in 1948 and 25 ppm in 1963 (18). In 1971, OSHA adopted the voluntary industrial limit of 10 ppm, set by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) as part of its acceptance of "national consensus standards" (19). In that same year, the International Labor Office (ILO), a specialized agency of the United Nations, adopted ILO Convention number 136, "Convention Concerning Protection Against Hazards Arising From Benzene," which incorporated the ACGIH's standard and set an international ceiling of 25 ppm for occupational exposure.
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A follow up on the adoption of using benzene in the dry cleaning industry reveals that a large group of cleaners didn't move from using benzene as a cheap and effective agent for business, but simply used safer handling techniques.
Apparently (your Google search terms may yield different results) the industry moved away from benzine for good after the 1963 ruling to lower the recommended count of 33 ppm in 1963. Since at that time OSHA had little or no enforcement capability at that time, it is unclear exactly how long it took the industry to move away from benzene compound.
No doubt you found that it is still used for cleaning in certain circumstances today.
No doubt you found it is still used in manufacture of certain goods.
In the end, I think I just don't care.
Robert
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In article <d84f9d46-1319-4bac-97cb-

Well, I tried a couple of experiments. I found out that 50% isopropyl does have some effect on both Varathane and tung oil.
I had intended to make a sample and set it aside for a year and see what happened, just for my one information, but in the process of doing that, I found that I had enough material to get some answers.
There was some dried stain on the bare (Harbor Freight jummy-)wood handle of the disposable brush I had used to apply it last time I used it. It had been there for more than a month so I think it was as cured as it's going to get. I tried alcohol on that. As expected, the stain on the surface came right off but that down in the grain wasn't touched. I poured alcohol on the handle and let it sit until it had nearly all evaporated then tried rubbing and it still did not remove the stain down in the crevices in the grain. I found a couple of drips on the bench top. I went after one of those with alcohol and it cleaned off with some effort. I tried the other one with a bare towel and it also came off, but in flakes that shook off of the towel rather than as a continuous discoloration.
I got out the bottle of tung oil (been years since I had touched it--had a child-safe cap on it and wasn't _that_ fun) and found that it had some runs and fingerprints and whatnot on the outside of the bottle. I tried wiping the runs and fingerprints and whatnot off with a towel and scraping them with my fingernail and neither removed them. So I wiped it down with a rag and alcohol and it again took some effort but it did clean up.
Conclusion--50% isopropyl will dissolve both Varathane Premium stain and 100% tung oil, but it is not particularly agressive about doing either and doesn't remove the stain from the indentations in the grain.
Now as to whether it should have "removed" the finishes, I'd really need to see the piece I think.
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