ff's is soft or hard maple preferred.

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Swingman mentioned that too. Do you mean reaction to other woods, or that some soft maple itself is reactionary, and what does that mean?
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When a tree grows on a hillside, stresses can build up in the lumber derived from the tree. Reaction wood is caused by these stresses, which when relieved during milling, will seriously compromise the dimensionally stability of the timber. In other words, it will warp or bow when you rip or resaw it.
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On 4/7/2016 10:44 AM, OFWW wrote:

Reactionary tends to warp or bow "immediately" after it is cut. The wood will often widen while being cut or the kerf will begin to close up as the cut is being made.
Swingman and I worked on a kitchen/bathroom remodel 5 years ago and I built a boat load of drawers for the bathrooms. We used hard maple and while ripping a piece to width it closed back up on the blade near the end of the cut and threw the keeper side back at me like a missile. Hit me just above the belt and thank goodness I was also wearing an apron. That was not pleasant. Fortunately only a large bruise.
A great reason to have a splitter on oru TS.
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I love this newsgroup. Very little noise and a whole lotta info.

R U kidding me!? I saw that shop safety film in the 9th grade. The film stated the reason the piece of wood got shot back was cuz; no guard thingie; the blade was set too low, hitting the work at an angle guaranteed to turn it into a projectile; not using "push stick". The film showed the actor's intestines wrapped around the lance-sized piece that impaled him. A total hoot fer a nineth grader, but deadly serious, now.
I see a lotta youtube vids showing a guy pushing work into the tablesaw blade with no push stick and the blade seemingly set quite low. What should I know that was not shown on that safety film from the 50s?
I'm going over, today, to look at a tablesaw I might use to make finger joints.
Thank you for the info on "reactionary" wood.
nb
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wrote:

It's ok to set the blade lowish, I believe the current thinking is that having the gullet just clear the wood is the best compromise between not exposing too much blade and trying to get the blade moving down through most of the cut.
Your fence needs to be parallel to the blade. This will reduce the likelihood of a piece applying pressure against the blade, which is one of the first ingredients in a kickback recipe.
Do not trap the workpiece between the blade and fence. If you're taking only a 1/8" off, set the fence so the wide side of the board is against the fence and the small side is cut off.
Realize that there are pieces that are just too small to be cut with a power saw of any kind safely. You may have to plan ahead on a project that uses them to make sure the final cut leaves you with an exact dimension piece.
Puckdropper
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I don't think lack of a "guard thingie" would be a factor in that particular problem, but lack of a splitter or riving knife would be.
As Puckdropper said, setting the blade low has advantages and is considered an OK practice today. Avoiding kickback means having a splitter/riving knife so that the kerf can't close on the blade. Also, as Puckdropper said, don't do thin cuts on the fence side (as you push the wood into the cut you'll tend to rotate it towards the blade if you're pushing on away side).
Push sticks, feather boards, and outfeed tables or rollers to keep the board from lifting off the table are also good ideas.
And, from personal experience, avoid cutting thru knots. Even what looks like a tight knot can come loose when the teeth hit it, and having half a knot whistle past your ear like a bullet really gets your attention.
John
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No doubt!
Thank you fer setting me straight.
I realize this is not half a century ago, but I still wondered. Thnx fer educating this geezer neophyte. I know what a feather board is and jes looked up "riving knife".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riving_knife
Kickback pawls are probably what I thought to be the "guard thingies" I saw on that ancient woodshop safety film.
I discovered our HOA has a rusty Craftman tablesaw and equally ancient Craftsman radial saw. Neither has a dado set, so I'll prolly wait fer my buddy, who has all three.
nb
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On 4/7/2016 6:18 PM, notbob wrote:

Rarely have used a TS guard since I got rid of my old overhead system, but never fail to use BOTH a push block, and a splitter.
The splitter/riving knife is the single most important device for preventing kickback on a through cut there is.
In the thousands of shop photos, it would be rare to see a glimpse of my table saw without some type of splitter ... this is one I made out of the old Delta guard that came with the saw ... not quite as effective as a riving knife, but a whole lot better than no splitter:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJustStuff?noredirect=1#5850516674541872338
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
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Swingman, that looks similar to something I was considering making. Is that mounted to the table or insert?
I like your extended length over the table. Am I safe to assume that it is a fixed height?
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On 4/7/2016 10:02 PM, OFWW wrote:

The splitter is attached to the blade guard mount common on a Unisaw:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJigsFixturesMethods?noredirect=1#5951774035513131010
Made from an old Delta blade guard part, so, unlike a riving knife, it does not move up and down with the blade (but it does tilt).
It has proven very difficult to adapt older table saws with a riving knife. There have been many attempts, most IME are not worth the money, and are kludgy and fussy.
Plus, the one's I've seen in action fail the most important attribute with regard to any "add on" to a table saw:
~ It must be so convenient, intuitive and easy to use that you never fail to use it. ~
I'm contemplating the purchase of a SawStop, and the number one feature that attracts me, besides the safety factor, is the built-in riving knife. Basically, I will never buy another table saw for shop use that does not incorporate a riving knife.

https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJigsFixturesMethods?noredirect=1#5684918761480695234
SCROLL RIGHT for three photos.
My own design and build. Attaches to the back of the table saw table (with a wide French cleat), and has two folding legs, with adjustable feet (not shown).
You can throw one together in a morning in the shop.
--
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Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
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On 4/7/2016 4:33 PM, John McCoy wrote:

Correct but most guards have a splitter of some sort. And unfortunately most guards are probably more likely to cause injury than not, given enough time and the right circumstances.
I will never forget the dufuss on one of the DIY channels, IIRC Brad Stagg on the Ultimate Workshop showing how to cut a dado, WITH THE GUARD IN PLACE. The look on his face when the wood hit the splitter was priceless as was watching him get out of that situation with out mishap.

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Maybe not so much, now that riving knives are becoming popular.

I have to admit having done almost the same thing, wanting to quickly put a 1/8 groove in a piece and hitting the splitter. I'd like to think that if I had changed the blade (which of course I didn't for the 1/8 groove) I would have remembered not to put the splitter back on.
John
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*snip*

*snip*

Speaking of push sticks, avoid making the Birdsmouth style. That's a notch cut out of the end of a piece of wood. Sometimes plastic molded ones are sold as "push sticks" or "getting started" tools, but those should be avoided. They're dangerous. They put pressure on the very end of the board, which encourages it to lift.
A "shoe" style or other form will be much better. They keep pressure along the entire board so it's not likely to lift.
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper says...

The utility of the birds mouth style is the last few inches of cut, where they keep your hand well separated from the blade. At that point if the board lifts it's not because you put a little pressure on the end.
At least if you subscribe to the "never put your hand above the blade" philosophy, which I do and some don't.
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On Fri, 8 Apr 2016 03:15:17 -0400, "J. Clarke"

+1
I never move my hand beyond the blade while it's spinning.
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On 4/7/2016 1:13 PM, notbob wrote:

Today.... ;~) Wait till school lets out, the squirrels will be plenty.

Well I'm not perfect and capable of making mistakes, unlike many that don't have much to show except their vast knowledge of how it will never happen to them. And eventually they make mistakes.... I do a lot of woodworking, compared to most. I know the risks and do what I can to guard against problems but do this long enough and you either accomplish little or one day you get hurt. Some never get hurt, some never have been in a car wreck.
A splitter is not always particle, like when cutting dado's or groves. I was using a push stick but again, something happened and you don't have time to think about that after something goes wrong.

You are going to have to be the judge as to what saw is best for you. My advise is to buy a good as you can afford. And past that get a SawStop. IMHO underpowered saws are more dangerous than those with plenty of hp. I would never consider less than 3hp but those are pricey.

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Whoa BABY! I'll make sure mine is on when I cut. You may have just saved a life, thank you.
I've been thinking about making a splitter to mount on the insert itself. Guess I'll be looking hard for one know.
Thanks!
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I have seen, altho not made one myself, splitters that are just a thin piece of wood sticking out of a zero-clearance insert. The key points are the splitter should be just a tad thinner than the blade, and aligned perfectly behind the blade.
Of course, you also want it strong enough that, if the kerf closes on it, it doesn't just snap off.
John
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On Fri, 8 Apr 2016 13:56:07 -0000 (UTC), John McCoy

Microjig makes these. I used them for a while but bought the knife for my Unisaur.

If it does, it'll still old the kerf open.
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On 4/7/2016 9:55 PM, OFWW wrote:

This splitter works pretty good. They offer one with a metal core and one that is all plastic. Get the metal core one. I used on for years.
http://www.microjig.com/products/mj-splitter/
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