Fast and easy cabinet door...Opinion

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On 12/11/2012 8:33 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I'll go the other route than most of the responses I've seen (altho haven't read everything in the thread it has been a fair fraction). If you standardize the sizes and do it as a production run w/, say, a square rail/stile, you could do conventional doors in a very short time and have a much nicer product in the end...
Amana and several others makes a mission-style cutter set that I like since I have 3/4"|1" spindle shaper but you can do it all w/ just the tablesaw as well...
They square up automagically on assembly if simply make sure the ends are cut square. I use wide stock wide enough for 3 or 4 at a time then rip to width and groove. Again, pick a few standard sizes and they can be turned out en masse...I've made such for shop and other not-for-prime-time use out of just standard one-by shelving stock and fir ply or even masonite/hardboard and w/ a coat of paint they're very presentable...
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Get the little woman to make curtains for the shelves.
Perhaps shades cut to size from the box store?
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On 12/11/2012 9:33 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

shop built cabinets. I'd like to put doors on the cabinets to keep the dust out of my stuff (well at least try). I want fast cheap and dimensionally stable. I could cut up a bunch of 3/4 MDF for the doors but that stuff is heavy and the hinges may rip out with shop use. I could make real rail and stile doors with a ply panel but that is a lot of work for a shop door. Plywood warps unless you use the expensive baltic birch stuff.

and laid it on the concrete floor. Using liquid nails I glued a series of 1x4 clear pine in the shape of the desired door sizes. Then I glue another sheet of luan to the top. Compress the whole thing with concrete blocks. After a couple of days, cut out the doors by ripping them such that each door has 1/2 the width of the 1x4. I'd end up with a light, strong and dimensionally stable, door. A 4x8 sheet of doors at a time. Would they be as good as I think?

Not quite the same but similar. When they built my yard shed, they nailed all of the 2X4 to the sheathing panel to form the door (Traditional barn type door) and door frame. They then brought the hole thing to the site. and cut the door out after it was part of the building.
I guess what I am saying it seems like a quick efficient way to make a lot of doors. They would be attractive, and sturdy.
One problem I see is the edges of the plywood where you cut the doors a part. It may splinter off leaving a less that attractive edge, so you may wish to consider a way of dressing the edges.
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Depending on the size, layout, and elegance of your shop cabinets, you might try sliding doors. These, of course, can be as fancy you like. If large, rollers in a track are helpful like pocket or shower doors. Smaller ones can ride in a rabbet. They won't be dust proof but will keep the possums out, are cheap, and could use essentially your original plan.

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