Edge Joining Plywood

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Rather than having to buy a whole sheet of plywood just to extend a small piece an inch or so, I decided to edge join fill and sand, before painting, since it the piece will be in a non-load bearing position at the roof of a cabinet.
Can I get recommendations on the best way between the following three pictured examples to go with?
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Woodworking%20Projects/EdgeJoiningPlywood.jpg
(I'm trying to keep this simple and fast).
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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On 11/21/2012 1:56 PM, snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote:

piece an inch or so, I decided to edge join fill and sand, before painting, since it the piece will be in a non-load bearing position at the roof of a cabinet.

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Woodworking%20Projects/EdgeJoiningPlywood.jpg
b
a&c probably won't work, unless you use a very extended overlap (like many inches at least).
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On Wednesday, November 21, 2012 4:00:06 PM UTC-5, chaniarts wrote:

I was afraid someone would say that.
Ok. In order to accomplish "B", let's say I grab my 1/4" slot cutting bit and make the slot in the edge of the main piece.
I then slide a 1/4" piece or hardwood into that slot and lay my router on top of the main piece in a position that will allow a 1/2" diameter straight bit (I don't think I have a Rabbeting bit) to rest on the hardwood before tightening it up to get the depth accurate. (And then route and do the same for the bottom).
Would that work?
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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On Wed, 21 Nov 2012 13:23:07 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote:

piece an inch or so, I decided to edge join fill and sand, before painting, since it the piece will be in a non-load bearing position at the roof of a cabinet.

of the main piece in a position that will allow a 1/2" diameter straight bit (I don't think I have a Rabbeting bit) to rest on the hardwood before tightening it up to get the depth accurate. (And then route and do the same for the bottom).

spline? No fussy set-up for the router for a second cut and plenty strong enough.
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On 11/21/12 2:56 PM, snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote:

painting, since it the piece will be in a non-load bearing position at the roof of a cabinet.

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Woodworking%20Projects/EdgeJoiningPlywood.jpg
None of the above. Just a simple butt joint. You can make the solid wood piece a bit thicker and then trim it flush with a pattern bit in a router table.
Or you can cut the pieces the same thickness and used some scrap pieces with wax paper to keep the edges aligned while clamping. You can also use pocket holes and screws.
I've done probably a couple hundred feet of this and I've tried all the fancy bit and edge joints and techniques and biscuits and every other what-not you see and hear about. What I settled on was simple butt joints, and flush trimming with the router. It's the fastest, easiest, and plenty strong enough. The glue is stronger than the plywood.
--

-MIKE-

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snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote:

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Woodworking%20Projects/EdgeJoiningPlywood.jpg
For what you want, any will work. Of the three you show, I'd probably do the first.
Other options: spline, biscuits, "V", butt. A butt joint would do fine especially if you used thickened epoxy as the glue; no need to clamp even, just push together and leave alone for a day.
--

dadiOH
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On 11/21/2012 2:56 PM, snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote:

What -MIKE- says, "none of the above" ... glue it up just as you would a panel, with a butt joint.
The only way I would differ would be to use biscuits, mainly because it makes it easier to align the faces, thus making it unnecessary to do any sanding and risk destroying the veneer, and I own a biscuit jointer.
I have made many a plywood panel wider/longer by doing the above simply by using cutoff's from the same sheet ... and by doing so, most of the time you can't even see the join in the finished part.
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On Wednesday, November 21, 2012 5:00:50 PM UTC-5, Swingman wrote:

Thanks everyone.
What was confusing me was the "butt joint". All the butt joints I've seen were with hardwood, and the joint was at a 45 angle.
It sounds like you are saying to just put glue on the edges of both plywood pieces and clamp them together. (No routing necessary).
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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On 11/21/2012 4:10 PM, snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote:

Technically, what you describe above is generally known as a "scarf" joint.

That's exactly what we're saying. :)
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On 11/21/12 4:14 PM, Swingman wrote:

You are much more succinct that I.
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Don't forget dowels as an alignment option, if you don't have a biscuit joiner.
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On 11/21/12 4:10 PM, snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote:

Yes. We like to make rocket science out of this stuff... and the people selling specialty jig and bit like to, as well. :-)
If you don't have a lot to do and can take your time, you can figure out a way to help line up and hold the joint so it it perfectly flush. I have a bunch of harbor freight wide mouth vise-grip clamps that work great for this. But often it's just a matter of taking the time to make sure it's flush as you're clamping. The problem with doing it "freehand" is that your solid wood piece has often warped a bit and won't line up along the entire length of plywood without some encouragement: clamps. But it can be done.
Like I wrote, having a router table makes the whole process much faster and stress free. If you have one, make the pieces thinker than the plywood and flush cut it with a pattern bit. If not, do your best and trim by sanding or a VERY sharp plane. <-- advanced technique, very easy to f@C# up. :-)
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On Wednesday, November 21, 2012 5:31:07 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:

The problem was that you keep using the term "solid wood" which I've always equated to mean *hardwood*, which of course is not what I'm working with.
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York
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On 11/21/2012 4:46 PM, snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote:

Although the technique is identical, I think Mike is focusing on what is akin to "edge banding" plywood with hardwood.
If I understand you correctly, you're just trying to add a bit of length to some too short plywood, with another piece of plywood.
Basic methodology is the same either way ... a glued "butt" joint.
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On 11/21/12 4:53 PM, Swingman wrote:

Oh, OK. I must've glanced over the part about doing a plywood to plywood joint.
In that case, I reiterate everything I wrote? :-) A butted glue joint, plywood to plywood, will be even stronger than to solid wood, because the expansion rates will be equal.
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On 11/21/2012 8:43 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Nonsense.
A scarfed joint maybe. But a butt joint? No way.
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On 11/21/12 11:02 PM, Richard wrote:

Are you going to back this up with any facts or just run away? Spouting off an opinion without backing it up is what is nonsense.
The glue will be stronger than the plywood. More surface area would be unnecessarily redundant. He already said it is non load bearing, so even more reason to do the simplest technique. However, even if it was load bearing, the glue joint would be stronger than the plywood.
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Yeah, but it's plywood which has a tendency to separate when force is applied to the slices ~ as compared to most any hardwood which does not.
I'm not going to label it nonsense, but I am highly dubious of glued butt joined plywood being able to withstand most any flexing or shearing force.
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Problem is that those expressing doubt are not speaking from any experience for the application.
Try it as I stated, with biscuits (or spline or domino) and your dubiousness will evaporate, most particularly when considering the OP's very clearly stated intended use ... a guaranteed fix for that circumstance.
Have simply done it too many times myself ...
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Ok, I hadn't read the OP's original message.
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