Dryer to Standard 220 Extension Cord

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Gfretwell wrote:

I'll remember that. Thanks!
-- Mark
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I misspoke ... "2 HP or more"
danm dyslexia!
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I'm working on the same problem -- only have a 120V/15A service into a detached garage and picked up <gloat mode on> a nearly new 3hp unisaw at an estate sale for next to nothing <gloat mode off>.
I made up a 'cheater' cord to run from the range receptacle in the house to the saw in the garage until I upgrade the electrical service out there.
I'm assuming you've got a dryer receptacle on the wall for the standard four-prong dryer plug. Have a look to make sure it has the separate ground back to the panel.
Get a spare dryer cord, a receptacle that matches the plug on your DC, and a steel box, matching cover plate, and box connector, if necessary.
The dryer plug has the U-shaped ground prong, two straight prongs on the sides for the main lines, and a L-shaped prong opposite the ground for the neutral line.
Your 240V DC doesn't need the neutral line. Use a hack saw to cut off the latter prong at the face of the plug. Cut the white wire off at the other end of the cord. Then connect the two lines and ground wire to the proper terminals on the receptacle for the DC plug. Do the wiring inside a metal box. Run a jumper inside the box to ground it, too.
The circuit is good for 30 amps, which is good for 5 hp or so. The potential issue is that if your motor overloads, and doesn't have its own overload protection, it'll cook long before the breaker trips. This shouldn't be a problem on a dust collector, however.
Good luck,
Tim
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Talk to a real electrician or go to Home Depot/Lowes/whatever and read a book on wiring. You only need three wires for a 220V circuit.
Modern dryer circuits have four wires because a dryer has both a 110V motor and controls and a 220V heating element.
Your dust collector only needs 220V with no 110V. Your dust collector will work fine if you make an extension cord with a dryer plug on one end.
Brian Elfert
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Really you only need two. The third is a safety ground.
Brian Elfert wrote:

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Not quite. The four wire outlet has two hot wires (110 VAC each), a neutral, and a ground. The older 3 wire plugs lack the ground. Even with the 3 wire outlet, you can get 110VAC from connecting to either hot wire, and the neutral.

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I have avoided saying it but this is "hold your nose" legal if you put it on a GFCI.
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As an owner of a 1962 house, I can tell ya that I had NO grounds connected at any outlet, nor a ground pin on any outlet. On the rare occasion when I run out of projects, I rewire the outlets in a room up to the current code. Fortunately, my wires did have a ground wire, but it was never connected. At least I have copper wires, unlike some coworkers.
My washer is now connected to a GFCI, but my drier still has the 3 wire outlet, and consequently, it isn't grounded.
Since you bring it up, have you checked to see if a GFCI is rated for a 1HP+ motor? If you don't have water in your shop, why would you want a GFCI?

on a

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The code says all 120v 15 or 20a receptacles in garages, unfinished basements or out buildings shall be on GFCI.
More to the point of my post, it also says when there is no ground present the only way you can use a 3 prong 120v receptacle is with a GFCI. (No a GFCI does NOT require a ground to function)
As for motor loads, the code requires GFCI protection on most spas and they usually have big motors. I have GFCI protection on all 120v circuits in my shop with no problems.
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basements
Well, dammit, I didn't know that! :-) Found this online: "According to the National Electrical Code, all garage-wall outlets must be GFCI outlets or standard outlets protected by GFCI circuit breakers" (http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/print/0,17071,216662,00.html )
I have a LOT of outlets in my garage/workshop. I might consider getting a GFCI breaker rather than rewire all the outlets (or daisy chain some).
More info I found online: Workshops - Of special interest to the DIYer. Your workshop, when in a garage or outbuilding with a floor at or below grade, must have GFCI protection on the 120 - volt receptacles. A 1999 change to the code dropped the word "unfinished" in reference to workshops and storage areas in garages and accessory buildings. So don't think that just because your shop has a finished floor it meets the code. Most workshops have a concrete floor, which tends to hold moisture, which increases shock potential and isn't considered "finished" for the code. Basement workshops follow the rules for basements. Two hundred twenty - volt outlets aren't specifically addressed in this part of the code. However, in a workshop setting they're generally for large machinery like table saws. Because the outlets will not accept a standard 120 - volt appliance cord, they fit the "not readily accessible" exception. (http://www.handymanclub.com/document.asp?cIDU&dID 2)
Learn something new everyday.
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You just need to put a receptacle GFCI in the first outlet in each branch circuit, connect the outgoing wires to the "load" terminal. If you have "home run" each receptacle that won't be as easy and the breaker route may be an easier, if more expensive, solution. From a real world perspective, the most important outlets are the ones that you will be using line powered hand tools on. "Fixed in place machines" with line cords safely routed out of the way are significantly safer than a hand tool that could have a damaged cord, missing ground pin or whatever. There is an exception to the GFCI rule that would cover the fixed in place equipment if there are no other accessible outlets on that circuit. You are also more likely to be sitting on the concrete floor when you are using that hand held tool. This can provide a very dangerous fault path through your body and that is why the GFCI rule was implimented.
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