Drilling bench dog holes?

Page 4 of 4  
They work great - drill on an angle or through odd stuff.
I like the aggressive ones - those with teeth edges and a hook while the standard ones are knife edges with a hook that cuts.
I use a 3/8" electric hand drill and once a 1/2" hammer drill in drill only.
Martin
On 11/17/2010 5:44 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"tiredofspam" wrote in message

With my itty bitty drill press it would be easier to clamp the drill press onto the bench and drill the holes that way.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"tiredofspam" <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in message

Was is a carbide spiral cutter or a steel one? So far I've only been able to find steel ones (1/2"shank). Considering the number of holes I'd like to drill, I'm concerned that a steel one will wear out or at least lose it's edge before I'm finished.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Upscale" wrote :

Which is why I posted my previous mea culpa.
Given your bench is only 1-3/4" thick, a 3/4" x 2", 2 blade straight cut router bit with 1/2" shank shouldn't have a problem clearing the chips.
If it were 3"-4" thick, different story, but it's only 1-3/4", different story.
Just make sure to use ac backer to eliminate tear out.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Haven't seen too many plunge routers with a 4" depth cutting ability anyway.

Of course, that's just common sense. Since I'll be using a template guide for the router I'm considering hogging out most of each hole with a 1/2" or so spade bit and then come along with the router to more easily finish the holes. But, I'll try a few initial holes with the bit only and if the going is not too difficult, I won't bother using the spade bit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Upscale" wrote:

Spade bits are for electricians running romex thru floor joists, not wood working, IMHO.
If you layout center lines on 6" centers on the fence, you will simplify maintaining registration and speed up the process significantly.
Lew .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

$30 drill guide and a sharp spade bit did a fine job on my table of 3- inch white oak. Clamp a backup piece to the bottom to prevent exit tearout.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Plunge router? Tape it in place and put tape around any openings that duse would escape with the exception of where you attach you Festool Vac. Use a 3/4" straight bit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Leon" wrote:

Already covered.
See my previous posts.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry, Like Minds..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yup, that's going to be my preferred method as suggested by Lew. It won't be too difficult for me to make a simple enclosure with the CT22 attached to house the router while I cut the holes. I already have a 3/4" carbide router bit, but it's single flute and I've long intended to buy a double flute bit, so this is my opportunity. A pieced of hardboard used as a template guide will round off the process.
I briefly considered using a brad point drill or perhaps a spade drill, but since I'm unable to lean over the drill to put weight on it as well as to easily eyeball a decent vertical entry point, my plunge router seems like the obvious choice.
Now, all I have to do is to convince my best friend to let me "borrow" my plunge router back from him. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/17/10 6:55 PM, Upscale wrote:

I wasn't considering your circumstances when suggesting the drill. However, any drill bit would produce far less dust, which was your main concern, no?
Do you know anyone with a right angle drill? I think you would be able to produce adequate down force with one of those.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Upscale, considering your problem with exerting adequate down force when drilling, have you every tried any type of self-feeding drill bits? Most are more of a carpenter tool rather than a woodworking tool, the quality of the hole will be more like a spade bit than a forstner, but maybe they would be useful to you. Something like an Irwin Speedbore. There are several other variations. (Still won't help with keeping the hole plumb, though)
--
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation
with the average voter. (Winston Churchill)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Part of the problem is that I've had self feeding bits get away from me and unless they're rigidly controlled, they drive themselves into the wood like a screw, especially soft wood. I have to be pretty careful when drilling. Just another irritation to experience when you can't bring your full body weight to bear controlling a tool. I do have a set of Irwin Speedbore spade bits and when using them I drill a bit, retract and drill a bit more. Seems to work and usually, they don't pull away from me.
I also have a very basic small benchtop drill press. If the plunge router set up doesn't work as hoped, I'll use the drill press and spade bit to drill the holes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Drill a pilot hole first, 1/8" or whatever size works best with your auger's lead screw. The auger will track dead on with the pilot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Time to splurge for a Festering router & shop vac. If you can't afford it, I'm sure Rob will be glad to give you the toys^H^Hols as he now has a surfeit of them. :-)
Luigi
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Already have the Festering shop vac. Considered the Festering router, but at the current retail price of $910, it's going to have to wait.
As far as Rob goes, I've invited him several times to drop by for a beer. So far, he's resisted. I think he knows I'm only interested in the machinery he has. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Upscale" wrote:

Just curious, what does a Milwaukee 5625 set you back these days?
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

$270
--
If your name is No, I voted for you - more than once ...


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.