Drilling bench dog holes?

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If I had my way, mine would be there, too -- and I'm sure I'm not the only one. Hand tools are quiet enough, and the temperature and humidity are near perfect.
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On Sat, 13 Nov 2010 20:19:19 -0500, Upscale wrote:

Everyone to his own preferences, but why do you object to the slight tilt? My experience has been that a tilt of a few degrees (I believe mine is 4 or 5 degrees) towards the vise keeps the dogs from tilting backwards or riding up when pressure is applied.
On your followup question about hole spacing, it should be at most a little less than your vise stroke. I set mine about half that to ensure most of a board is always flat on the table. I use a variation of a French leg vise and have one at the front and back edges of the bench. I put one row of holes in line with each of those vises and another right down the middle.
A handy add on is a "double dog" that spans the bench (or the two vises) and another that spans from either edge to the center row of holes.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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I agree with those comments only that I maybe mistakenly assumed that the slight downward tilt needed was already incorporated in the flat face of most bench dogs. As demonstrated with these two bench dogs which have 2 and 3 degree downward faces built in.
http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p1127&cat=1,41637,41645,31127 http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p1129&cat=1,41637,41645,31129
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Upscale wrote:

If you want a hole that is perpendicular to the surface and don't want to spring for new router bit(s) or make a jig, you can do it with it a drill and router bits you most likely already have. As an example, lets say you want to wind up with a 3/4" hole...
1. Drill a hole with a 1/2" drill bit. It doesn't matter if it isn't completely vertical as long as you are close.
2. Use a 3/8" router bit with a 1/4" shank with the depth set to less than the depth of the hole and run it around the hole using the shank as a bearing. The part you cut is now 3/4" and vertical.
3. Turn the workpiece over. Use any router bit less than the diameter of the hole with a shank the same size (eg, 1/2 & 1/2, 1/4 and 1/4) and run it around the hole using the shank as a bearing on what you cut in #2.
--

dadiOH
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On Sun, 14 Nov 2010 15:40:34 -0500, Upscale wrote:

Oh. I made my own to save money and they're just plywood shapes (various) attached to a dowel. So I tilted the holes in the bench.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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I had a similar size benchtop, same materials and thickness. I hiked it up on my drill press using a roller ball support stand on either side of the drill press. Then I used a 3/4" forstner bit to drill all the holes. I used a couple of Bessey cabinet clamps to clamp it to the drill press table before I drilled each hole. It sounds cumbersome but it actually went pretty fast and smooth once I got the benchtop loaded on the two stands.
Bob
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Yikes, my slab is over 250 lbs. I could not imagine doing that. I had enough trouble getting it down the stairs.
I used a router with a 3/4 ONSRUD spiral cutter. It too went fast.
On 11/17/2010 10:01 AM, Bob wrote:

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What am I missing here? Is this really rocket surgery? What's wrong with a hand held drill and a Forstner bit? Don't bench dogs work with the friction of being pushed from the side? To my knowledge, you shouldn't have to pound them in and out, so who needs a perfect hole?
Or am I wrong? There's always a first. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Wed, 17 Nov 2010 14:24:14 -0600, -MIKE- wrote:

Out of curiosity, why a Forstner bit? Don't dog holes go all the way through?
I've never used a Forstner bit in other than a drill press. Seems I read somewhere they weren't safe otherwise.
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Larry Blanchard wrote:

By design using a Forstner bit will give you an indication that the hole is started perpendicular to the table top. Once started the design of the bit will aid in keeping it perpendicular.
I use Forstner bits in a hand held drill frequently. I've never had a problem... although you have to keep a tight grip on the drill when using the larger bits.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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On 11/17/10 5:44 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Ok, a spade bit. I figured the entry hole would be cleaner.

Poppycosh. (I've never used that word, until now.) I use them all the time in a hand held drill.
--

-MIKE-

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On 18/11/2010 00:15, -MIKE- wrote:

Poppycock means nonsense - which is what I think you meant
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On 11/18/10 5:32 AM, nicknoxx wrote:

I'm full of poppycosh, now that I've been made aware the need to pay more attention to my smell-chequer. Thank you. :-)
--

-MIKE-

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I think the root of poppycosh must be Poppy hyperbolic cosine. :-)
Martin
On 11/18/2010 5:32 AM, nicknoxx wrote:

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MIKE- wrote:

A brad point drill bit is easier to control in a hand held drill as well as providing better chip clearance.
Lew
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On 11/17/10 6:16 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

You guys crack me up. Please change original to, "What's wrong with a hand held drill to drill bench dog holes."
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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-MIKE- wrote:

Nothing, if you don't mind a few imperfections. Since I have way less experience than most around here, I think I would try a plunge router and a fence. Not sure how deep one could drill that way, though. After that, I'd clamp down a wooden "mouth" to hold down the wood, to prevent tear-out. If thick enough, it might serve as a jig to guide the drill too.
Bill
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On 11/17/10 6:44 PM, Bill wrote:

No, I don't... on a work bench. Especially if you're talking about the minimal amount of tear-out you might get at the entry point, which could easily be avoided with the same piece of scrap you use with the router, or taken care of after the fact in 10 seconds with a piece of sandpaper.
But, as I mentioned before.. it's a WORK BENCH, not a dining room table.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Boy, have you got a shock coming. I've met people who worship their work benches infinitely more than any dining room table. You can get a dining room table anywhere, but a really good workbench? They're only found once or twice in a lifetime and for some, they never get to experience the joys of a truly beautiful work bench.
It's called Nirvana my friend and is something that's experienced by too few.
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On 11/17/10 7:14 PM, Upscale wrote:

It's no shock to me..... no, I take that back. I'm often shocked by how anal people get with protecting stuff they build to use to make stuff that matters. :-)

See, that's the problem. We're supposed to build the dining room table.

Found? I thought we were building it?
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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