Drilling bench dog holes?

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My 1-3/4" thick solid laminated maple work bench is exactly that, solid. That means no dog holes. Anyone have experience drilling 3/4" diameter bench dog holes that are actually vertical as they should be and not slightly tilted? I've considered using my router except that it would create quite a bit of dust and that's not at all desirable considering that the bench is located in my living room.
Thanks
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It also occurred to me. Is there a recommended spacing for these holes? My bench is 72" long x 30" deep.
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I used a spade bit with drill guide called a Portalign. I don't think it's in production any more, but there are similar devices around, such this one from Sears:
http://www.mysears.com/Craftsman-Drill-Guide-reviews
For using the dogs in the table with dogs on a moveable vice jaw, the table holes should be spaced no farther apart than the vice travel.
Mine were 7/8" diameter. Some pictures here:
http://bullfire.net/Bench/WP_Bench.html
I'm not sure I can help much with the mess the drilling will make.
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wrote in message

The spacing should be equal to the stroke of your vice. I have mine at 12" and I also have http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?pb720&cat=1,41637,41645
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Yup, I've been eyeing those for awhile as well as the Veritas surface vise. http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?pc825&cat=1,41637
Assuming I ignore the stoke of the vise (it's well over 12"), and considering the use of bench dogs and pups, I was wondering how far in from the front edge I should place the first line of holes?
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On Sun, 14 Nov 2010 00:12:15 -0500, "Ed Pawlowski"

Just _short_ of the working stroke.

Bench pups are nice, but DAMN, look what they're getting for them now! I hate that the Canuckistani Ducat is so high now. I got them for a whole lot cheaper last decade.
-- To the well-organized mind, death is but the next great adventure. -- J. K. Rowling
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"Upscale" wrote:

------------------------------ Dust is a problem you live with or equip your plunge router with D/C.
That given, I'd use a plunge router with at least a 2" stroke and a spiral milling cutter, not a normal router bit.
Assuming your router base is 5-3/4" dia,, replace it with a piece of 1/2" MDF, 6" W x 60"-72" long with router centered.
Clamp a straight edge to the bench, offset 3" from dog holes centerline using another piece of 1/2" MDF.
Slide router into position and clamp extended base, butted against straight edge, to table and drill/cut 3/4" dia. dog hole.
When finished, index to next position and repeat.
Holes to be on 6" centers.
Have fun.
Lew
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One traditional method of doing this is to take a nice sized, square cornered block of wood and drill a 3/4" (or whatever dia. you desire) hole through it on a drillpress. Then use the block as a guide for a hand-held drill on the workbench. It's not perfect because repeated usei will enlarge the guide block hole and allow some play, potentially making the target hole somewhat off-plumb, but it work's pretty darn good if reasonable care is used.
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
  Click to see the full signature.
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Thanks, I'll keep that idea in mind. I may even have a source for a metal guide block with 3/4" hole in it.
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If it's already got the hole, go for it, but no real need for metal unless you're making benches on a production line.
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On Nov 13, 10:14pm, snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

If he's got a set of Forstners then a variation on that is to drill the hole the size of the shank of the Forstner and cut a relief in the bottom of the block for the body of the Forstner. Same works with spade bits. You get some wear but for making a dozen or so dog holes it shouldn't be an issue. With Forstners make sure to clear the bit regularly--down under a block of wood you can't tell what it's doing and they're easy to wreck.
If you want to fancy it up, glue the block to a piece of Masonite or thin MDF or plywood or whatever you've got an appropriately-sized scrap of and put an edge guide and a reference hole in it.
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In the past, I did jury rig a total enclosure for a trim router when I was trimming some acrylic, which can be quite messy. It wouldn't be too difficult for me to do the same when cutting bench dog holes ~ just a bigger enclosure needed and maybe a connection to my Festool CT22 dust collector . And, I do own a Makita 3612BR plunge router which meets the requirements you've laid out.

Not familar with spiral milling cutters. Are they some type of upcutting bit? What advantage would one be over a standard 3/4" router bit?
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"Upscale" wrote:

------------------------------ In the metal working trades would be known as an "End Mill", typically 4 flute.
Definitely NOT a wood working item.
Don't know who would have them in Canada.
Check a local machine shop for their source. -----------------------------

------------------------------- Chip clearance.
An end mill will have an up spiral, very useful for continuous chip removaL with a D/C system.
Have fun.
Lew
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A router bit does not cut at the center of the bit, and as mentioned, they do not lift the chips out of the hole.
I would use a forsner style drill bit, shortened, if need be, and turned down by a machine shop to fit your _variable-speed_ router. It could be a good idea (depending on the design of the bit) to modify the cutting angle of the face to only be a few degrees so it will not try to feed too fast and over-load your router.
I think this setup would make a more precisely dimensioned and smooth set of holes than an end mill cutter, and be less likely to clog up with chips.
--
Jim in NC


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snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net says...

Like these?
http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?pB891&cat=1,46168,46171
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"phorbin" wrote:

---------------------------------- That works, even though available only in HSS.
Mea Culpa RE: Carbide End Mill
Looks like a 3/4" end mill with a 1/2" shank selling for something less than the national debt will be only slightly harder to find than a set of hen's teeth.
Looks like a 3/4" x 2", 1/2" shank, dual flute, carbide router bit is your choice.
Will just require some patience to keep chips cleared out.
BTW, install a backer board against bottom of top to prevent blow out when bit pierces thru bottom of top.
Have fun.
Lew
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I used Rockler's long shank 3/4" carbide forstner drill bit plus their drill guide:
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=2406&filter=drill%20guide
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.... I've considered using my router except that it would create quite a

This has turned into an interesting and informative string. But I have to ask the question:
Why is it in you living room? Just nosy. :^}
RonB
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Essentially, it's because I live in a one bedroom apartment and use a wheelchair. In well over 10 years of looking, I haven't been able to find a wheelchair accessible space to rent or perhaps share with someone that is within the realm of affordable. I'd be willing to pay $300-$400 a month for a space that's accessible and less than 30 minutes or so Toronto transit travel time time. So far, I've not been able to find anything other than commercial spaces that are $1000 a month and up. To compound the problem, Toronto's subway system is slightly less than 50% wheelchair accessible which cuts down greatly on my potential search area.
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wrote in message

Upscale,
Here is Southern California apartments known as live/work units are now becoming popular in urban areas. I did some design work in one that had a rollup door on the ground level with the living areas above. The building has elevator service to get from one level to another. One such place I worked on you can see at this website.
http://www.bluwatercrossingapts.com/Apartments/module/photos/property [id]/22170/
Floor plan here:
http://www.bluwatercrossingapts.com/media_library/1106/4bd5bcb439d9d199.j pg
Hope this helps.
Steve
Perhaps contacting a real estate agent and telling them you want a live/work unit.
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