Can you think of a safer way to cut a tiny piece of wood on a table saw?

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> snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: >
By the way, I checked out your other videos and you have some really cool stuff. I feel a kindred spirit with you in the inventor realm.
It would be a shame to lose a great, resourceful mind to shrapnel from that saw contraption. :-)
Love the coffee roaster. I use hot air corn poppers.
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-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 09:09:35 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

1. I think chips could be a problem. 2. If the hold down fails it throws the piece directly at the operator. 3. The blade is trying to lift the piece.
In general you would do better to put a hold down on a regular RAS fence and pull the blade through the way a normal RAS is designed. The rotation of a normal RAS blade pushes the piece down against the table and back against the fence. If your blade is sharp and you approach the piece with reasonable caution there is virtually no risk of the piece flying about, and if it does it will go back, away from the operator. It also directs almost all the chips away from the operator. As configured in that video a carbide tooth coming loose is likely to cause some injury.
I just don't see any benefit and several potential drawbacks. I may have missed something, but what was the original problem you were trying to solve with this setup?
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
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This whole setup gave me the willies. How did I get by all these years of woodworking without a RAS? I noticed the sliding bed racked a little as it was pushed into the blade. Having both hands on the sled puts his body directly in front of a spinning blade without much of a safety cover. It would be safer on a table saw with a zero-clearance throat plate. A bandsaw, like another already stated, is right tool for small pieces. One technique is to take two pencils with erasers and maneuver a small piece over the bandsaw table into the blade.
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I remember this thread from a few weeks back and I was confused then also. What are you trying to get to? I am not being a jerk but I am confused as to what you are doing. In the video you took a 3/4 piece of ply and cut it in half. So if I am correct you created a jig than can produce little pieces of 3/8 plywood. I thought the initial issue was to take a 5" x 5" piece of ply and make it 4" x 4". Could you enlighten me?
Larry C
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Larry C wrote:

What I don't understand is "why"?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Quite true. It looks to me more like an AWTH (accident waiting to happen).

In general, low. In this specific setup, though, I think fairly high. You have several things working against you: - the single hold-down screw inevitably makes for less than perfectly even clamping pressure - such a thin narrow workpiece is easily susceptible to twisting, especially when the clamping force is assymmetric... - ... and even more so when there is no guide or stop that would prevent twisting.

Obviously very little.

Never mind the hands -- look where the operator is standing: directly in the line of fire if *anything* goes wrong. Doesn't look like a wise idea to me.
This cut would be made much more safely with any of the following: - table saw (with an appropriate guide fixture) - band saw - scroll saw - hack saw - coping saw
Do you not own any of the above?
And why the devil do you need to make a cut like this on such a small workpiece, anyway?? If you need two tiny pieces, as shown in the video, you don't _start_out_ with a small piece, for heaven's sake. If you need two slices say 1 x 2 x 1/4" thick, you cut two 1/4" slices off the end of a ten-inch 1x2 -- which can be done in perfect safety with a chop saw, radial arm saw, or table saw, without the need for any sort of fixtures at all beyond the standard guides and fences that come with the tools.
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