Can Pan Cake Air Compressor Refill a 5-gal Air Tank for a Brad Gun?

Page 2 of 2  
I can usually fire a full strip of 18 ga. brads from a fully pressurized (125 psi) 5 gallon tank. The pancake compressor or any compressor will fill the tank just fine, the only difference would be in how long it takes to do so. When filling at a service station, they may have the pressure at the hose available to customers for filling tires regulated to lower than the maximum available.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have the small compressor that Senco sells with their brad FP18 brad gun. Its perfectly matched. The compressor hardly makes any noise at all. Its sounds more like a mad butterfly. In fact, I could run out in the open in my driveway and the neighbors still would not notice.
Now if you buy a much bigger direct drive oil-less compressor, those things will rattle your teeth. I understand you can do an effective job enlosing one to knock the sound down.
If I were you, I'd spend the dollars on the little Senco compressor rather than an air tank. Their brad nailer is top notch.
Bob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Would you please give me the manufacturer name and model number of that ultra quiet small air compressor, and where do you order it if you don't mind.
My another alterative is Delta CP200. According to the spec, it is described as having a quiet motor.
I have given up on the 1.5HP 2-gal Craftman single-hot-dog air compressor because its spec doesn't say whether it is quiet or not (it is oil-lubed direct drive). I assume that if it doesn't say so, "quietness" may not be its selling point.
Thanks.
Jay Chan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jay Chan said:

I wouldn't base any purchasing decision on whether the manufacturer describes it as "quiet". Being a relative term, it means nothing - quiet compared to what? A jet plane? Another compressor?
Unless they give a decibel reading, it's all meaningless.
Your best bet would be to go and look at them in person and decide for yourself just how quiet they really are.
P.S. - Many manufacturers advertising material consists of lies and half-truths.
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg G. wrote:

Those are the good ones. The bad ones leave out the half-truths.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jay Chan said:

Another point I forgot to mention is that it isn't the *motor* that makes most of the noise - it is the compressor itself. The air pump doing it's job of moving air around rapidly. The intake and exhausts of the compressor pump are where most of the noise comes from.
It sounds like you are looking for a vibrating diaphragm pump. They are generally quieter than a piston pump. You could operate one of these in an apartment and no one would notice. The problem is, they are slow to generate much air pressure.
FWIW,
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oh no... That Delta CP200 was at the top of my list. Now, I may need to rethink... Thanks anyway.
Jay Chan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jay Chan said:

I'm not saying it isn't quiet, I'm just saying that 'quiet' is a relative term. For all I know the CP200 absorbs noise from the room it is operated in. <g> I don't have one - I use a loud and noisy 20 gallon Cambell Hausfield compressor.
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The compressor is Senco branded. I don't know if its sold separately under a different brand. Here's a link on the Woodcraft website
http://shop.woodcraft.com/Woodcraft/product_family.asp?family%5FidG94&gift lse&mscssid4B0879FCD70D42299AD47F6F71F3C9
If that link fails, go to www.woodcraft.com and search for "Senco compressor".
The compressor is the smallest compressor I have seen anywhere and I really like the size. I can lift it with one hand. Just recently, I used the nailer to tack down a bunch of floor sheathing in the attic. I could walk up the attic stairway with nailer hooked on my belt and compressor in one hand. When I was using it, I would put down a 4 foot wood strip for a guide and pop the brads out at a rate of about 2/second. The little compressor faithfully did its job. I would hate to have been doing this same job lugging around the one of the other compressors I've seen (like the Porter Cable model).
Woodcraft prices are pure retail. If I had been on my toes, I could have purchased this combo at Lowe's for 10-20% off.
Bob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think I have found the combo kit that you are using. The compressor model number is PC1010, and the model number of the combo kit is PC0947. It is advertised as ultra quiet air compressor.

May I ask you two things about your Senco small and quiet air compressor:
- Does it say whether it can support the use of a finish-nailer? Review in Amazon.com said that it is not suitable for a finish-nailer. I am not sure whether this means it is not suitable for a finish-nailer PERIOD, or whether this means it is not suitable for finish-nailer in a production environment instead of a DIY environment.
- Does the operation instruction say anything about the possible uses of this air compressor other than using it with a nailer?
This is always nice to talk with something who actually has the air compressor that I am interested.
Thanks.
Jay Chan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jay, I tried to find information to answer your question but the consumption specs are not available for Senco 15-16 ga nailers.
My guess is that the PC 1010 will operate it but will not keep up. It will go up to 120 PSI, but only 0.7 scfm at 90 PSI. The consumption of my Finish Pro 18 nailer is 0.84 scfm at 60 brads/second so it closely matches the compressor. The Finish pro XL25, a heavy duty brad nailer is 1.9 scfm at 90 PSI at a rate of 60 brads/minute. The larger nailers will surely consume more. With only a 1 gallon tank, I think the PC1010 may be a disappointment to operate the 15 or 16 ga nailers under anything but a few nails per minute. The pump up time for the PC 1010 compressor is 128 seconds (0-120 PSI) and it will recover from 90-120 PSI in 35 seconds. My guess is that you would have to limit the nailing rate for a larger nailer to about 4-5 per minute.
Bob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for giving me your assessment of how the small air compressor matching a finish nailer.
Actually, 4-5 finish nails a minute is more than enough for me. I am not a "fast-moving" woodworker. I like to do thing slowly. I will order a Senco ultra quiet air compressor nailer combo right after posting this message. Thanks for recommending this combo kit to me. I will first use it to nail baseboard trimming in my basement project.
This also means that please don't tell me there is a much better one else where.
Jay Chan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I used the Senco ultra quiet compressor with a Senco finish nailer (FP35) in this weekend. I found that the compressor will start kicking in after I had shot five 15-gauge finish nails. Then, I still could shoot the sixth nail without any problem. I didn't try to shoot the seventh nail; I just waited 10 seconds to let the compressor to catch up a bit before I shot any more nail.
This is of course not good enough for "production" use. But for DIYer like me who tends to work slowly and tends to have down time between shooting nails, it is good enough.
If I got a two-hot-dogs compressor, I (as a DIYer) probably would never ever need to pause to wait for the compressor. But then I would need to pay more and had to carry the heavy load around (it would be heavy as comparing to the very light Senco ultra quiet compressor). Therefore, I feel that I am much better off using the Senco ultra quiet compressor.
Yes, it is quite quiet. I cannot hear it running in the basement when I walked up to the first floor (and the floor is not well insulated nor sound-proof).
By the way, it works perfectly fine with the bundled FP-18 brad nailer. I don't remember hearing the compressor ever needs to kick in when I used the brad nailer to shoot brads at quarter-round shoe-molding around the entire basement wall. It might have kicked in once. But this happens so infrequent that I cannot recall this ever happens.
The bottom line is: It is cheap enough, quiet, very light, takes very little room, great for brads, and OK for finish nails for DIY usage.
Thanks for the recommendation on that compressor/brad-nailer combo.
Jay Chan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.