Can laminated hardboard be used to make zero clearance throat plates for a table saw?

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Can laminated hardboard, the kind used commonly for shelving, be used to make zero clearance throat plates for a table saw.
I've made throat plates from plywood by cutting them to fit and then raising the blade to cut a slot.
The smooth laminate seems like it would be suitable to make a zero clearance plate, but are there any reasons not to try this?
Thanks for any advice.
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wrote:

By laminated hardboard I presume you mean an MDF substrate with a top layer of high pressure laminate, (Formica Wilsonart etc). It would make an excellent throat plate providing you can get the thickness you need. You can also laminate your own plywood with PLam. Joe G
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

No reasons.
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dadiOH
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Assuming what you are talking about is Melamine shelving, I doubt it would be very good. Typically Melamine shelving is made with OSB and or particle board.
Melemine on MDF would be much better.
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On 8/4/10 3:50 PM, Leon wrote:

Yeah, MDF would work great, but definitely not the chip-n-spit boards I've seen in prepacked garage shelving units.
I wonder if there are standards and/or a reference to such standards for all the "termite vomit" (LOVE that term) products out there.
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-MIKE-

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Termite mounds are made from termite vomit. You could just about run a Mack truck into a termite mound and the truck would lose. The mounds also have central heating and AC. The mounds are also tourist attractions in Oz. So, way better than chip 'n spit boards.
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I use some left over manufactured flooring (like Pergo) Tough stuff. I drill and tap for setscrews to adjust the leveling. WW
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It may be worth knowing that there have been reports of unsecured plates being lifted as the blade cuts and then ejected into the face of the operator.
Jeff
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Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
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catch the table top? I don't know of any that are positively attached to the saw. The pin in the back can simply be a screw. Of course, when raising the blade to make the slot the plate has to be clamped down. Am I missing something?
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On 8/5/10 7:12 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

No, you're not.
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as far as the hold down all you have to do is attatsh s clip or metal plate to the rear with a screw. There must be enough clearance - maybe 12 inch or so - for it to to slide in easily when you drop the plate in very easy but a holdown clip is for certain a good and safe idea. Don't forget the splitter which should be as thick as the blade andas high as most of the wood that you will cut. It has to be in line with the blade. Good luck
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mtnbikeddie wrote: ...

...
Perhaps, but I've never seen one and have never heard of an incident the insert being "thrown".
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On 8/6/2010 2:20 PM, dpb wrote:

Still, why tempt fate? The one time it happens it's gonna clip the mother-in-law in the back of the head and she's going to claim that you did it deliberately and there's the end of domestic tranquility for the next decade or so.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Some odds are so long as to make them essentially non-existent likelihoods. Out of all the PM-66's and Unisaurs that afaik have never had a single one w/ a insert plate lock mechanism it seems even if it were a occurring but rare event it would have surfaced sometime in the last 70-80 years or so given the number of opportunities. Yet I'd never even heard it broached as a possibility what more an event until a few posters up...
$0.001...
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On Fri, 06 Aug 2010 15:25:57 -0500, dpb wrote:

That was my reaction as well. My 1948 Delta is the only saw I've owned that had a clip in the back. The manufacturers must have since concluded that it added nothing to safety - and if the lawyers let them get away with it they were probably right :-).
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Why look on the downside? Upside is domestic tranquility forever.
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Me neither. The only way it could happen is not having it secured while the initial cut through was being made, or if it was made so loose that it could rattle around in the pocket.
--
Jim in NC



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wrote

Blades do become non-flat, often during a cutting operation and this is especially likely with a think kerf blade if it gets hot. Then it starts to widen the insert slot and....
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catch the table top? I don't know of any that are positively attached to the saw.
The older Cradtsman TS required the loosening of a front countersunk Philips head machine screw. When loosened a key hole slot in the front of the insert would allow the insert to slide up and forward and finally up again and off the table. The back end of the insert had a bracket that slid under the table top.
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On 8/5/10 2:40 PM, Leon wrote:

My Delta has a machine screw on the front end and a nipple on the back.
Guess my point is that it's kind of irrelevant to what material is being used.
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