Best way to make a dado

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Now I know why I want to build my router table with wheels.
Gary
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LOL! Are you SURE you can't use real horses? What if they're nice and calm? Then the horses could do the moving and the router could sit still! Lots easier than all that pushing/pulling!
Wayyy back when, I helped run a farm while the guy was in hospital. He used Erie Mules, huge, gigantic, muscled animals that were as gentle as a momma's breath. They could even successfully back a 4-wheeled manure spreader down the length of the barn by just hollering "Backa, backa, backa" at them til they got where you wanted them. Then you continued shovelling.
Pop
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"Pop" wrote in message

Brought back memories ... when I got of the service, and besides music which was kinda lean back then, I went back to shoeing horses, mainly because at that point I didn't give a damn about doing anything else but chasing women and raising hell, and it gave me ample opportunity to be worthless and do both.
Two of the stables I routinely worked at still used mules to pull the manure wagons through the barns. I still have one of the mule collars, and until a few years ago, my Dad still had one of the four wheel manure wagons laying around his farm I scored when the stables closed, maybe still does.
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Try being more careful. Any way that works is best. If it is difficult to handle long boards, then dont' usethe router table, but clamp a bit of wood as a freehand router guide.
Make mistakes. We all do. That's how we learn ...sometimes. Your technique and attention to detail will improve immensely when you get you next lumber bill.
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Guess who wrote:

I made a dado jig a while back, and while I liked its adjustability, I was concerned over whether or not the rails were clamped flush to the workpiece. That is, I was concerned that the depth of cut would vary throughout the cut - most likely full depth at the edges and somewhat less deep in the middle. The cause of this could be that the rails flex a bit as you clamp them down on each side of the workpiece.
Does anyone here have the same concerns? I'm thinking of a slight curve, like a clamping caul, to the rails. Someday. This post just got me thinking.
JP
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Jay Pique wrote:

Do you have your workpiece on a nice flat surface? Is your jig made out of a stable material (i.e. MDF or Plywood)? I have to think, that even if you were using warped wood in your jig, the weight of the rotuer would help to eliminate some of that play.
Chuck
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wrote:

No. You are working with warped wood. First plane it flat, and the router will follow that path instead of a warped one. If you don't have the proper tools you can't do a proper job. I've been there, so I know both alternatives.
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Unless you are clamping so hard as to compress the wood, this is not a concern.
wrote:

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You need to take that router out of the table.
For years I didn't have a decent TS. My fence was terrible at best and only cut 28" to the right of the blade. I used Pat Warner's technique religiously after I saw a video on the net.
1. Lay your side pieces on a flat table. 2. Stand the shelf piece on the side. 3. Butt 2 pieces of MDF with factory edges on either side of the shelf. 4. Remove the shelf. 5. Chuck a Flush trim bit with a short cutting length into you router and adjust the height for an appropriate dado. 6. Route a perfectly fitting Dado for that specific shelf piece.
The real trick here is to route the dados from the board that will become both your side pieces, so the dados are parrell. In other words, cut a panel to size that equals 2x 1 side (plus a litte extra for fudge factor). Route your dados. Then cut the shelf pieces to size.
Of course, now that I have a decent TS and fence, I use a dado blade. But I swore by that router method before I saved up enough quarters.
Good luck,
Chuck
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It really isn't easy to make a dado in a long board on a tablesaw. It's possible, sure, but if it's longer than your table and wider than a couple of feet, you're pretty much out of luck. Get a router with a straightedge and you won't have a problem.
I ran into that problem when I was building shelving and needed 3/4" dados every 5.5" throughout 10-foot boards. There wasn't any clearance on either side of the tablesaw to make the cut, even if I had been crazy enough to try to support it on both sides. I just clamped the boards together, side-by-side, routed the dados so they were identical on both sides, and bingo.
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wrote:

you mean, bob's your uncle.
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This jig with a straight cutting bit with top mounted bearing. http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/dado.html

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And umm disregard the note on the jig indicating which way to face the router. That note was on the jig as a reminder when it was designed to be used with a router guide bushing. With a top bearing bit the router can be clocked or turned during the cut.
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On 3/2/2006 10:38 AM stryped mumbled something about the following:

Since you don't want this archived, I'll archive your question for you.
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Construct a slotted jig for your router such that the router base rides against sides on the jig. Make the jig such that it can be securely clamped on the bookcase side. Once you have the jig built, cutting perfect dados will be a snap. Using a dado blade in a table saw is the easiest. Either method can produce perfect dadoes.
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