Another helpful tip

Folks, it's not enough to just dial in that perfect router fence setting. You should actually lock it down before proceeding. You will find this to be a rather more productive use of your time.
Ah well, I really wanted to resaw and glue up another bookmatched cherry drawer front anyway. Now I have the perfect excuse!
-Leuf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, and it helps greatly to lock the motor adjustment too. I find that a PC 892 squirms quite a bit while unlocked.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Condolences. One of those "if only" moments I'm sure.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leuf wrote:

Put you in a room full of horse manure and you'd be looking for the pony. A classic optimist - or a master of sarcasm.
We all experience "thinkos" -the mental equivalent of a typo. But tool designers should have worked out their thinkos BEFORE putting a machine into productions and circulation. I'm thinking specifically of the idiot who designed and/or approved the Porter Cable D-Handle (the one with the motor that has the short power cord that plugs into the D-handle) motor holding collar locking mechanism - you know - the one most people eventually get around to replacing with a ratcheting handled bolt that will lock things in place for real. \
Now given the start up torque rotation the motor has when fired up - you know - the one that tries to turn the router upside down - you'd think they'd remember their action/reaction lecture and use a locking mechanism that works - without the use of channel locks or a pipe wrench - with a 2' piece of pipe slipped over the handle to provide a little more leverage.
The first time you pull the trigger on the D-handle and the motor starts to spin its way out of the "locked" collar, winding up that short power cord plugged into the D-handle you've got a death grip on, trying desperately to let off the trigger before the motor - with that spinning chunk of carbide - escapes - to lord only knows where - but probably towards flesh . . .
Rant mode off.
Leuf: You're probably wondering why this problem didn't occur on the test cuts. Well when a thinko has more consequence the lesson learned sticks a lot better.
Condolences.
charlie b
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Reminds me of the time I made a tapered-rabbet / dado on my router table. An interesting but useless cut.
-- Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That reminds me of the time that my router table threw the side of a curly maple clock case 20 ft into the driveway.
Clamp down the table fence, dummy!
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.