air compressors


I'm thinking about picking up a largish air compressor for amazon while they have the $150 off sale. I'm thinking about these porter cable models:
CPLKC7080V2 which is 7hp: (Amazon.com product link shortened)39842521/sr=1-62/ref=sr_1_62/102-7602621-8748109?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance&n"8013
and
C7550 which says 7.5hp: (Amazon.com product link shortened)39842521/sr=1-63/ref=sr_1_63/102-7602621-8748109?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance&n"8013
Other than the HP rating, I can't see a difference. I think the CPLKC7080V2 might be an older version. It's not listed on the porter cable website. Does anyone have either of these?
Also any opinions of the maxus compressors on amazon? I've never heard of them. But maybe they're made in the same chinese factories as the PCs?
brian
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I see aluminum on the pump. Personally I would go for an Ingersoll-Rand, a very well respected brand that has been in the business for years.
For about $10 more you can get the IR shipped for free with equal to better specs performance and cast iron cylinders and a smaller motor and slightly smaller tank. That said it is rated for continuous duty, IIRC the PC does not mention that.
Look Here.
http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay2?storeIdi70&productId!1720&R!1720
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BTY the later of the 2 PC's that you are asking has cast iron cylinders. I would go that on over the one with aluminum cylinders if only considering PC compressors.
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I read somewhere that they are aluminum (for improved cooling they say) but cast iron cylinder sleeves. I'm ok with that. Also, the manual for the c7550 says this:
This air compressor pump is capable of running continuously. However, to prolong the life of your air compressor, it is recommended that a 50%-75% average duty cycle be maintained; that is, the air compressor pump should not run more than 30-45 minutes in any given hour.
That's probably ok for me. I'd want continuous duty for spraying from time to time, but would never do that every day. And I'm sure I would empty the gun and need to refill before the 30 minutes is up. I can't imagine standing in one spot with an air sander for more than 30 minutes also.
I'd probably rather have the IR also. But I'm trying to strike a balance between cost and performance. This is probably already much more compressor than I need. My main uses are going to be hvlp and automotive work. I might get into metalwork and stone sculpting some time in the future. I'm also trying to take advantage of the $150 off sale at amazon.
brian
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Cast iron is much better. Worth looking for.

You may never exceed this duty cycle and you'd be ok, but if you think you might ever, on any off chance, perhaps one day be running a compressor hard, get a continuous duty cycle unit.

Spraying won't require continuous duty cycle, but if you ever run a DA (air powered orbital sander) you sure will.

IR is great stuff, but there is other stuff out there that is very good and costs less. You're right that it's probably more than you need now, but you will put it to more and more use once you have it. If you're going to do automotive work then get the big tank and go for 100% duty cycle. 15-18 SCFM also.
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)39842521/sr=1-62/ref=sr_1_62/102-7602621-8748109?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance&n"8013
(Amazon.com product link shortened)39842521/sr=1-63/ref=sr_1_63/102-7602621-8748109?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance&n"8013
The C7550 is a great compressor. Although, for home/hobby use, either will work fine for many years. The 7HP version uses a very common compressor, all aluminum cylinders and a cheap air filter system. The C7550, uses cast iron and has a real air filter. This is important in a dusty environment. We use that same pump on several back-up compressors and they last for years, even with commercial use.
Dave
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Thanks, this is just the kind of info I was after.
Do you bolt them to the floor? I had originally planned to put this on the same mobile base I make for everything else (for the inevitable move or if I want to rearrange things temporarily). My mobile base is either 2x4s or 4x4s half-lapped into an X pattern so that they pass under the four feet of the machine, then lagscrewed to the machine. The length of the 2x4s depends on the top-heavyness of the machine. And I usually over-do the casters so that they have big wheels. The manual says to use expansion bolts in concrete though in order to avoid vibration. Seems a bit excessive to me.
brian
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I have an Ingersol Rand. I have had it for just about a year now, The warranty that comes with it is superb! I did have a problem with the selenoid, I called them and they had the part to me within 24 hours. I do not have it bolted to the floor, but I have isolators between the compressor and the floor, just seems to help with vibrating . I can run this compressor constantly without problems. My uncle has an IR compressor for about 15 years, still works great as far as I know NOW. He owns an auto body repair shop so his compressor runs quite abit! I trust IR and the reputation they have for great products.
searcher
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Yes. And No. In the dealership, they sit directly on 2x6 treated lumber, on pins (redheads, but no nut on top). At home, the compressor is also sits on sleepers with 4x4 square rubber pads (old tire), all bolted securely to the pad. Dave Dave
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Not advisable to put compressors on wheels. Bolted down is usually the recommendation and in some areas may even be required by some local code. Consider this to be a fixture in your shop, not a mobile device.
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Mike Marlow wrote:

Wouldn't that depend on the compressor (size & layout), as well as the wheels?
I wouldn't put an 80 or 120 gallon upright on a skinny mobile base, but large horizontal tanked units are put on wheels all the time.
Barry
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I'll just put it on my usual mobile base, but put some 4x4 sleepers under the base to get the wheels off the floor. I'll screw them to the base and make them plenty big. I'm mainly worried about it tipping over. It doesn't need to move around much, but I want to be able to wheel it into a uhaul trailer fairly quickly.
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Uprights are extremely top heavy Brian, and not horribly balanced. They're usually stable enough to stand up on isolation pads without bolting them to the floor, but that's about the extent of their stability. They're very heavy as well. I don't think you'd find it an attractive option to lift your base to get sleepers in/out from under the base. Between the raw weight of these things and the top heavy, imbalanced nature of them, you really won't want to move them much at all. If mobility is important, you should consider a compressor mounted on wheels that lays down rather than an upright.
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Yup - but the OP had posted links to uprights - 80 gallon units.
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Mike Marlow wrote:

I didn't see that, so I agree with you.
I wouldn't want to see that sucker fall over...
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)39842521/sr=1-62/ref=sr_1_62/102-7602621-8748109?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance&n"8013
Good looking specs, but I have no familiarity with the compressor. SCFM delivery rates are very nice - well more than you'll ever need by a long shot. Ignore the suggested list price. No one sells compressors for the suggested list.

(Amazon.com product link shortened)39842521/sr=1-63/ref=sr_1_63/102-7602621-8748109?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance&n"8013
Not enough information on this compressor to offer an opinion. I didn't spend any time at all trying to find the model number with a google search though.

Maxus is a brand manufactured by Campbel Hausfeld and is an extremely good compressor. Single stage, but it outputs like a two stage. Five year warranty. It's manufactured right here in the US of A. All of CH's stuff is... or at least they were. If they're made off shore now, it's a fairly recent development. Which model Maxus are you looking at? Check the CH web site for factory repaired compressors. You can often find very good deals there, though the warranty might not be quite the same as a new one.
Watch out for names like Porter Cable on a compressor. The tools guys don't manufacture a compressor and all they do is take a stock unit from one of the three or four manufacturers out there, have it painted the way they want, and sometimes throw in an extra like a pressure gauge, or a switch. Look carefully at CH as they manufacture most of the private label compressors. Look at DeVilbiss as well, though I can't remember if they got bought out or not. Just be careful with names that have appeal because of their tool legacy - like I say, they don't build the thing and 99% of the time they don't even spec one. This is a market where you're talking off-the-shelf stuff.
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