A woodwork newbie. Issues setting up workshop in non-airconditioned South Florida garage?

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Has anyone experienced problems storing power tools, or other workshop paraphernalia (varnishes etc) long term in a workshop that has no a/c and is in a tropical humid climate?
I keep portable power tools inside, partly for security but table saws etc are going to be too big.
Cheers
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Owamanga:
I don't live where there's a lot humidity like Florida, but suggest that you might want to do the following:
1) Get a dehumidfier for the garage.
2) Work at keeping rust at bay. Use floor wax (no silicone) on tablesaws, blades, chisels, etc. to prevent them from getting rust. I'd imagine you will have to this on a regular basis, like weekly.
3) Look for Boshield at a Rockler, Woodcraft (I think Lowes might carry it). It's a rust inhibitor. Instructions on the product.
Good luck. Also do a Google search in this newsgroup for terms like "humidity" "Florida", etc. A lot of woodworkers are in Florida.
Oh, find a class or a club near by. Ask the members what they would do. A club might be found by doing a Google search.
MJ Wallace
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

<snip good suggestions, 1) dehumidifier, 2) wax, 3) Boeshield>
I have also found that rapid changes in temperature accelerates oxidation, so using an AC has to be a constant thing, in which case the shop needs to be well insulated.
H
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I too have been researching cooling my 1 car garage workshop.
For my purposes (hobbyist plus car in garage when tools not in use) I am almost decided on the portable AC units.
My understanding is that swamp coolers (evaporative cooling) won't work in Florida.
Has anyone used the portable AC units? They have small intake and exhaust hoses about 5 feet long. I plan on opening the garage door a few inches and putting the hoses there when the AC is in use. I'll put some scrap wood along the rest of the door to seal it a bit.
The portable units are very expensive compared to a window unit about 5-600 $ for 10,000 BTUs. I'd like to get the temperature down to about 80 within 45 minutes.
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wrote:

You quickly discover how leaky a garage is when you start dumping BTUs of cooling in there, waiting for a change. I put a fairly big window shaker in mine (~6-7kbtu) and it didn't do squat. If you stood right in front of it you were OK but on the other end of the garage it was still hot. Swamp coolers don't work in a swamp. They should be called desert coolers.
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I tried a portable A/C unit for a few days (3 car garashop) and it didn't do squat even with insulation. Way undersized, but might help in a smaller area. I ran the vent hose into the attic to get rid of the exhaust. Remember that these things suck in 20-25 percent outside air as the exchange air for dumping the heat outside. So if the thing blows 250 cubic feet per minute, it will suck in 50-60 cfm for the exhaust stream. They're not very efficient for that reason. We use it in the dog days of summer to sleep cool the bedroom. If you know someone who has one, see if you can borrow it for a couple of days and see how it works out.
It wouldn't cool my shop, but for detail work, you can adjust the vents to blow on you while working quietly at the bench. My face would sweat, but my back was comfy. Check the window a/c web sites for sizing assistance. I found that helpful when I was looking at window units. Westinghouse and GE are a couple sites I remember.
Hope this helps.
Regards, Roy
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I've tried both window and portable A/C in a garage and neither did much except spin the electric meter...
My best cooling is with a LARGE round-cage fan blowing in a window and another big box fan blowing out the garage door... with A/C I tried working with the door closed and it just got hotter...
In my office I use a window unit with a small oscillating fan in front of it to spread the air... a ceiling fan would help, too.. but both would be disruptive in a shop...
My new shop will be enclosed and have built in heat and A/C but that presents another set of problems... keeping dust out of the unit... *sigh*

Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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Well, not that it's really useful info, but I seperated my unit in it's own little space in a corner of the garage. I've got the intakes in the "closet" if you will, pretty good. I can go about 4 months before changing the filter on the unit itself, and once a month or so on the filters on the intakes. I buy the el cheapo blue fiberglass filters by the case for a little of nothing. It's a 2 ton unit that serves double duty heating/cooling the garage and shop.

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On Mon, 12 Jun 2006 17:23:17 GMT, Owamanga

I live in Mississippi (high heat, high humidity) No air in shop. No real problems. Have to clean and wax those cast iron tables every so often, but not a problem. Most of the rust on the tools come from me dripping sweat on them.
I visited a couple of shops that were in the Bahamas. Comments by the owners "if you use the stuff it doesn't have time to rust".
Frank
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wrote:

I had an garage shop in Kissimmee and really did not have a problem with rust. I kept the tools waxed and ran an 18-20 inch fan constantly. Currently I have a separate shop building in the Ocala area and have the same results using the wax/fan.
Good Luck. MikeG
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A $78 window air conditioner saves the tools and the man. No sweat on the tools, moisure content of lumber is stable, and its as cheap as a dehumidifier.
Jim with no sweat in Kentucky

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I used a $78 window unit, and another, and another. Even with a good filter system in a very small shop, dust is a killer on the window unit. So, for $200 and a little digging, I got central air and heat. Life is good as filters are 2 bucks a piece.:also with no sweat in Kentucky!
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Tim Taylor wrote:

Well, I'm in a small (11x13) shop with no dust collection other than a homemade box with fan and filters to get the really fine stuff out of the air. Half the time I forget to run it.
I've got a window AC (maybe $98) that I've been using for about 4 years now. It still runs fine. I cut down a furnace filter and taped it across the intake on the outside. Every time I vacuum the floor, I run the vacuum over the filter. So far so good.
Note that I am a hobbyist and my four years of use probably doesn't equal one year of full time use. But still, for that price ...
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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Oh yea, I agree with you. I just could never remember to clean the dang filter!!! Seemed like I was pulling the unit 3 or 4 times a year and spraying the coils. You know what they say about age I hope, cause I forgot.
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DAGS. There have been at least two big threads on this in the last year.

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Owamanga wrote:

Like was said earlier, if you use it it won't rust. But if you aren't apt to use the tools a great amount and just aim to tinker with some projects here and there, you might check into some with cast aluminum tables. I've a small craftsman table saw that sees very little use (maybe twice per year) and aside from wiping the dust off of it I've never had any problems.
Also located in humid Kentucky,
D.
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snipped-for-privacy@wku.edu wrote:

That is a profoundly illogical statement. Oxidation isn't inhibited by mechanical activity.
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Dhakala wrote:

Thank you Mr. Spock....
Though true in a strictly speaking sense, your statement doesn't really hold water for this particular discussion.
Mechanical activity doesn't "inhibit" oxidization but the use of woodworking tools does. It helps prevent and reduce the effects of oxidization.
Just so we're clear. Oxidization --- in simple terms --- rust.
I'm no scientist but I know that if I use my tools regularly they don't rust. My uneducated guess would be the oils from your hands, sap from boards, and abrasion created by sliding wood/materials across the metal surfaces combine to help polish and protect them from rust.
If you take two saws and use one once or twice a week for a month and leave the second alone for the same time frame I'll bet you that the unused saw will show signs of rust.
I think it's the sorrow of imagined abandonment that causes unused tools to rust. They become scared that you've forgotten about them and their tears of sorrow and heartache cause the rust.... ;-)
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Bullshit.
wrote:

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Its clear you don't fall in the class of woodworkers that actually use your tools very often. My fathers table saw NEVER received any rust preventive for 20+ years. It's only recently I had to use some TopCote. But then again, he is 80!
Dave
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