Wall insulation bodge required!

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Christian McArdle wrote:

Really, I only thought of using boarding instead of plasterboard simply because I could use the saved thickness for extra insulation. I could most likely use 30mm insulation plus 5mm plywood over 25mm insulation and ~10mm plasterboard. Perhaps I could compromise and fit the kitchen units right up to the insulation, and fit 9.5mm plasterboard around it afterwards? That way I'd only loose a bit of work surface and still get a nice finish. It doesn't matter what the finish looks like behind the washing machine, and it would still be insulated.
-Duncan
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I've only ever seen 25mm insulation, not 30mm. Make sure you use Celotex or Kingspan, though, not polystyrene. Quite frankly, the difference between 25mm and 30mm isn't that important. The difference between 0mm and 5mm is much bigger!

and it would still be

I think I'd prefer having the plasterboard between the celotex and the appliances. Some appliances get rather hot and Celotex isn't that brilliant as a fire proofing material...
Christian.
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Christian McArdle wrote:

They list quite a range on their web site for "Celotex tuff-R Zero GA3000Z" - 12mm, then 20 to 90mm in 5mm steps. Getting a stockest might not be quite as straight forward... But yes, I think 25mm would be a good starting point, and if I can use anything more I will.

Good point. Perhaps some thin MDF behind the units where required, just in case.
-Duncan
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Plasterboard is an good fire resistant material. You can even get a specific fire resistant grade, with even better properties.
Christian.
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Christian McArdle wrote:

yes. MDF DOES burn well, with unpleasant fumes.

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Christian McArdle wrote:

Its not bad. I tried to burn some. It charred eventually, and there was a small amount of flame, but it wouldn't sustain combustion on its own. Took a hot fire to get rid of the scraps, no noxious fumes really - and I had to break down the residue.

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Duncan Lees wrote:

Don't Panic.
Remember that kichen units themselves have large pgaps at the bak, and a nice enclosed airspace.
This is what I'd do
mark out where units are going, and glue celotex slabs wherever there is room behind. OK appliances will have to go back against teh walls - but nothings perfect.
Then fit units and worktop. But NOT high level cupboards.
Batten out the walls 1.5" adding nice load bearing noggins wherever cupboards need to be screwed, and reqire using steel boxes where you want the leccy stuff to go, and stick celotex evereywhere, and then plasterboard/MDF or whatever. Mount cupboards on top of that once decoretaed and tile. OK you lose a little depth but...

Yes, exactly, but remember cupboards are a moveable feast, and provide SOME insulation, worktops and units are standard width BUT can be tapered back to clear dorrways etc, and provided you have about 900mm walkspace minimum you can operate effectively.
I battended out the wall about an inch in parts but still mounted the cupboards to the existing wall, and clad under them. Its unnoticeable without a measuring stick.
makes it easy to add sockets too,.

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writes

Absolutely, they'll be 50-100mm of dead space behind the back panels of base units, so you can very easily slice the depth down to get 50mm of celotex + plasterboard (or ply). Wall units use as is, they'll be a bit closer than normal, that's all. Depending on the units, you may have to reposition some of shelf fixings, although I've done a couple of kitchens where units have been slimmed down to give more user space, fit in corner runs, appliances etc, don't recall any problems, though sinks & appliances may by an issue (so step back to normal depth a couple of units from the door? Make a feature of it somehow)
--
Steven Briggs



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....

If you cut the excess depth off the sides before assembling, they would not need to go back to the wall. The worktop would need to be cut down the same amount too though.
Colin Bignell
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Hi
I'm not familiar with celotex but I cant help asking an almost cheeky question. Is the surface by any chance hard enough that one could fit celotex, fill any gaps, and paper straight onto it? If so that would give you 50% more insulation depth. It sounds unlikely, but always worth asking.
Regards, NT
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I've not actually seen the stuff before, but I'd be surprised if you couldn't poke your finger through it's surface. So it should need a solid covering to prevent the wall being damaged. I could be wrong though...
-Duncan
N. Thornton wrote:

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Duncan Lees <duncan-at-snsys-dot-com> wrote in message

Someone can tell us. It occurred to me that formica sheet would be good for this, its very cheap (at least when attached to chip it is), has quite a good durable surface, and insulation plus formica would be good insulation wise. No doubt theres a reason for not using it though.
Regards, NT
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