Tradesmen

Page 1 of 2  
I live on the outskirts of the South East - well OK Milton Keynes and fortunately I don't often need tradesmen. However I'm led to beleive that plumbers and electricians are like gold dust (and earning big if they're any good). So my question is this: Which trade should I get into Plumbing or sparking ? I am competent at both but sadly always seem to back the wrong horse!
What are peoples experiences of getting these people in ? (I know you should be d-i-y ing ;)
What do you think ?
Cheers
Tim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tzd3sw wrote:

To do electrics you will soon have to be registered which will cost you money Plumbing is said currently to be very lucrative esp in London.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If only it was just money. To do the work, you'll have to work for a registered company. Registered companies have to work for a year before they can be registered. Not even Kafka could make this up.
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If my understanding of the regulations is correct you do not have to be registered to do the work but the work needs to be signed off by someone who is registered. This could be a NICEIC member or, I believe when the regulations are implemented, you can do the work under a building notice and get the LA to check the work.
Obviously both these options will cost you money, but these costs can be factored into the quote. Even if you were registered, the costs of testing would still have to be allowed for.
So in effect there is nothing to stop you trading using this method until you have been trading for the required period.
Anyone know any different?
--
Danny Burns
www.buildsure.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

What you say is correct as far as it goes.
However, there appears to be nothing to stop you doing the job and leaving the onus on the homeowner to get the certification done.
Perhaps not a good idea in so far that if the homeowner doesn't get the certification and subsequently an accident happens then the blame fixing game will start.
And after contacting the local council about this, the end result of asking the council to come out and certify an installation may actually be the job subcontracted out to an electrician. You might as well try to form that relationship directly with the electrician is my thinking.
PoP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This is a great selling point, the fact that you pay the Building Inspector to check you work ..........
Rick

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why is it any different from having to have the Building inspector check the brickwork, footings etc.?
That raises an interesting point, when building an extension and fitting new sockets and lights will the L.A. Check everything on the same building notice or do you apply for two different building notices?
--
Danny Burns
www.buildsure.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Plumbing. Seen job adverts for the same company where Plumbers are getting substantially more than Electricians.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One of my PC support people is leaving to become a plumber.
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11 Nov 2003 19:02:28 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ukmisc.org.uk (Huge) wrote:

Anyone avidly following Dilbert over the years will recognise the essential synergy between these two occupations in terms of people skills. Although I think a standard was set in "The Office" that even Scott Adams would struggle to meet ;-)
--
I have a vitally important role serving as a bad example.

Mail john rather than nospam...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 11 Nov 2003 21:44:13 +0000, John Laird

Plumbing is easier. If you get a total blockage, the plumber is just expected to fix it. PC support are expected to make things flow again, but preserve the contents exaclty how they were.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 12 Nov 2003 01:26:58 +0000, Andy Dingley

IT support is less prone to get you covered in shit. Working as a plumber downstream of a total blockage does tend to make the IT career seem much more enjoyable ;)
PoP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 12 Nov 2003 01:26:58 +0000, Andy Dingley

This would have real meaning for a Saniflo fixer.
Semper in Excretum - sed alto variat.....
.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11 Nov 2003 03:21:14 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (tzd3sw) wrote:

I practice as a general handyman, but not exactly in your area (I will do if you pay enough.... ;)). Let me deal with the two trades you mention separately.
Plumbing. You try getting on a course - they are jam packed full for the next couple of years, leastways they are around here in the Thames Valley.
I was talking to the principal of our local college last week, and asked him why the college didn't offer plumbing. He said because they didn't have the square footage to fit the courses in. But more importantly he advised that he knows heads of other colleges where plumbing is on the schedule and the consensus of opinion is that in 2-3 years time plumbing will be going through what the IT industry has been the last couple of years - a shitload of people trained as plumbers and not enough work. Plus when the new EU legislation kicks into gear anyone from the very enlarged EU will be able to come and work in the UK - for a lot less money. Plumbing will be a skill they will have, or our very helpful government will give them.
End result: Lots of disenfranchised plumbers wandering about wondering what else they can do to earn a living.
Electrical. In order to practice as an electrician you will need to acquire your NVQ's, which to the ordinary bloke in the street means an apprenticeship sponsored by an employer. You'll have to go to college for 2-3 years. Then you have to become NICEIC registered and buy a shitload of test equipment (cheapest outfit is about 800). Question is, can you afford to work for diddly-squat and make cups of tea for other workers?
The new electrical regulations which are coming into force within the next 12 months will most likely prevent you offering electrical services. These regulations require issuing of certificates on completion of work. And you try finding an electrician who is willing to write a certificate on your behalf!
You might be able to get a job in B&Q assisting others with their purchases, but I fear the days of being able to do odd jobs for others in order to earn a living are drawing to a close.
PoP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I have absolutely no qualifications, and no-one will touch me for woodworking jobs as other than a minimum-wage labourer.
So I'm thinking about bidding to maintain the West Coast main line.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Qualifications seem to about right then How about your mis-management structure? Is that on par with what some of the other companies have? Also what systems dont you have in place to deal with non record keeping and preferably under training?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The skills shortage of the near future (apart from medical) would seem to be in automotive technical. Newer cars have more and more 'systems' which the standard mechanic cant (or doesn't want to ) do anything with. Most current mechanics are too busy earning a living to take time off to retrain. It seems to be one of these areas, like early IT where a little specialist knowledge covers 90% of the job. Im not knocking current techies, either.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That may be true. However I have experience of working on the Rover Testbook software design some years ago.
The problem is getting hold of a Testbook. Without that I don't believe you can interrogate the onboard systems, let alone adjust them.
Rover were (and probably still are) very selective about releasing Testbook to "back street repair outfits". This was to stop the competition beating them up.
PoP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OOO, Count me in !
Actually with the governments record on outsourcing they will probably pay us just to quote. Hmmmm.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You did say they earn plenty if they're any good. That's just it- I think the qualities required to be a good tradesman are fairly rare!Most people IMO have not got the resilience,quick brain(partic for plumbing&elec)dexterity and coordination to be good enough no matter how hard they try.
Jon
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.