The House the 50s Built pt 4

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Hey, I didn't know Triumph had single-handedly come up with the
innovative idea of overboring an engine to make it bigger.
According to the presenter, that is.

Also, mis-identifying an A35 as an A30.

Re: The House the 50s Built pt 4
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Glad I'm not the only one who spotted the larger rear window....

Re: The House the 50s Built pt 4
Phil wrote:

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But can you tell anything apart these days?  Perhaps in 50 years
time the current schoolboys will still remember which Mondeo was
the Mk IV, but somehow I doubt it.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon  Nottingham UK
chris@cdixon.me.uk

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Re: The House the 50s Built pt 4


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They wont have to remember it, they can just look it up instead.


Re: The House the 50s Built pt 4
On Fri, 29 Jun 2012 03:50:39 -0700 (PDT), Phil

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Didn't the A30 have a chrome grille? Always looked a bit smarter IMHO
than the painted ones on the A 35. I was going to swap to one on my
A35 van but by then (1973) finding a chrome one in good nick was rare
and I didn't have much cash to spare on such fripperies.

G,Harman

Re: The House the 50s Built pt 4
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Yup. Other obvious difference was flashing indicators - although many A30s
will have been updated to these.

--
*Everybody lies, but it doesn't matter since nobody listens*

    Dave Plowman        dave@davenoise.co.uk           London SW
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Re: The House the 50s Built pt 4
On Fri, 29 Jun 2012 17:41:30 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

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Wonder if that applied to cars only,my A35 van had trafficators. Even
by the early 70's these were becoming fairly rare and I got the odd
indignant hoot from somebody who thought I hadn't indicated.
Having belonged to a farmer for the 12 years before I got it and
liberally covered with farm muck inside and out the BMC paint finish
had already long lost the battle to keep the floor intact and it soon
went to a scrappy after donating the engine and gearbox to mates with
Morris 1000's.
To get back to the programme now I have seen it,the demonstration of
cylinders and pistons looked fun . I wonder what the actual power
produced was,over a certain amount what they built would be a firearm
which is why firing spuds from drainpipes  even using innocent
sounding propellants like hairspray is not something that those who do
it in the UK shout much about,but I'm told it's bloody satisfying.

G.Harman

Re: The House the 50s Built pt 4
On Sat, 30 Jun 2012 16:28:04 +0100, damduck-egg@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

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Yes, indicators were an optional fitting on the vans, long after the
saloon had them as standard (iirc, you could still insist on
trafficators on the saloon for a few years - also on the Morris 1000).
Tight-fisted small shop owners saw no need to pay extra for
indicators, heaters, etc.
Count yourself lucky wheels were essential.

Re: The House the 50s Built pt 4
On Thu, 28 Jun 2012 22:00:49 +0100, Grimly Curmudgeon

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Pergolas in the 1950s?

Re: The House the 50s Built pt 4
On Fri, 29 Jun 2012 16:06:27 +0100, Peter Johnson

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Possible, but not widespread, iirc.
I didn't notice the doors in the house - to be in keeping the panelled
doors should have been flushed over with hardboard and some hideous
handles affixed.
Or was that mainly a 60s thing?
I blame Barry Bucknell, anyway.

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