Removing Artex

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wrote:

Don't spend two minutes thinking about steaming it off, it takes hours and makes a mess of the plaster under the artex anyway. Get a scraper and some blades and have a go at just hacking it off. It will need replastering anyway. :-)
Mark S.
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wrote:

Steamer. Messy job, but it's easy, mindless work. It's even easier on a ceiling, as gravity shifts much of it.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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I've got tons of Artex to remove in my flat. Fortunately though I remembered reading on this news group a while ago that some guy had experimented with a few different things and found that coating it in wallpaper paste and then covering it with a bin bag would do the trick - the idea being that the bin bag stops the paste from drying in so it gets a chance to soak the offending material.
Well I tried this recently in and all I can say is that whoever this guy is, he's a genius. Honestly the stuff I've been dealing with is real heavy duty artex with layers of paint on it. But 24 hours later after the paste and bin bag treatment it was coming right off.
The consistency is perfect for achieving a flat finish as well - take a bit of care when you're doing it and and you won't have to skim it or anything.
Seriously give this a try it really does work.
Stephen

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Andy Dingley <> wrote

Seconded. Use a heavy duty (trade) steamer though, not a shed one.
Shifted mine in no time.
Cheers,
Paul.
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On 24 Nov 2003 08:52:35 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@technologist.com (Zymurgy) wrote:

I've never found any benefit to "trade" steamers. I use mine mainly for steam bending, so I have quite an appetite for steam.
IMHE, the limit is electrical capacity and the size of the heater element. Once you're into the 3kW region, then you can't do much above that.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Andy Dingley wrote

I just had a powerful one to hand and it took some time to steam through. I just imagine it would be harder work with a black and decker diy stripper.
Cheers,
Paul.
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What do you bend?
I'm serious.
Mary
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Wood, I imagine.
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
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On Tue, 25 Nov 2003 23:10:09 -0000, "Mary Fisher"
Ash mainly. Sometimes oak, but split green ash is much easier to use for bending (cheap too!). I also steam beech to colour it, but most beech I get is already kiln dried and I'd much rather use green timber for bending.
As to why I'm doing it, then it's mainly furniture making - chair backs (although I don't like Windsors, I have made them), eye rings for yurts, even the odd crossbow.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Right - and you use a steam cleaner? I've suggested to Spouse that he did that ... this is encouraging.

What is it about Windsors which makes them so popular? Rhetorical question only.
We don't need a yurt with all our other 'mobile homes' and crossbows are out of our period, longbows don't need bending. But there have been occasions when we've wanted to bend smallish section timber. Thanks.
Mary

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On Thu, 27 Nov 2003 00:42:24 -0000, "Mary Fisher"

Try Googling rec.woodworking - I've posted before http://www.google.com/groups?safe=off&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_ugroup=rec.woodworking&as_usubject=steam&as_uauthors= snipped-for-privacy@codesmiths.com&lr=&hl=en
The main thing is to use split, green timber, not something kiln-dried and sawn with sloping grain. Getting the steam is the easy bit.

Iconic status, obvious hand-made nature. if you're going for an "artisan" chair, make it obvious.
Some of the big US windsors were attractive, but the UK stuff was (IMHO) never more than cheap furniture to keep the backsides of the proleteriat off the ground.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Well of course ... that's obvious.

Well it depends on your resources. A kettle's no good.

question
A well made hand-made item won't look hand-made.

Mary
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On Thu, 27 Nov 2003 23:05:56 -0000, "Mary Fisher"

Not that obvious. There's a _lot_ of people who waste time trying to steam dried timber because that's what they know how to get. You have to get out there in the woods and and get it fresh !

I think a windsor char does. It doesn't look "unfinished" in any way, but it's a style that always looks like "a handmade windsor" as opposed to the otherwise rather similar, but factory-made "french bentwood cafe".
One of my next jobs is to make a medieval ark-styled chest. Riven oak, rather than sawn and adzed finish (I'll probably cheat and use a Japanee spear plane though). Now _that_ will look hand-made, tapered boards, scalloped surface and everything.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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