Remember mould behind bed in the bedroom?

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On Sun, 4 Jan 2004 22:57:57 -0000, "Mary Fisher"
|Why on Earth didn't you crop that picture - we don't need all those trees, |tarmac and other houses! Huge pictures like yours take a l-o-n-g time to |load.
Yes, yes. I know. Sorry.
<snip> |We had rockwool cavity wall insulation installed some years ago. We hadn't |had a damp problem before this but afterwards the house had a more even |temperature and we noticed that the windows were showing more condensation |than before, presumably because the walls were then less cold than the glass |(double glazed). | |In case what I said is misinterpreted, we haven't had a damp problem since |either. The house is a 1937 brick built semi. | Thanks Mary. Looks like this is the answer. Is it a messy or very costly process?
H.
--
Howard Coakley
e-mail... howard<dot}coakleyatcoakley<dot].codotuk
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<snip>
|

Not at all messy. The Big Van stays in the street, it's a bit noisy and rumbly while the motor blows the stuff through holes pre-drilled at intervals by the contractor. There was absolutely no mess. Ours took a couple of hours I think, not much more. The holes were made good, we didn't think it was expensive as a long term insulation project.
I'd advise against taking a huge amount of notice of tempting information about how much you'll save in fuel, that depends on many variables. The overall comfort in our house, a more even temperature throughout the house with no cold patches, made it worthwhile without thinking of how much fuel we might or might not have saved.
Although I do hope that, on environmental grounds, we're not burning as much gas ...
Mary

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Hi,
Is the render porous in any way? Any rain landing on a wall in that situation (surrounded by trees and sheltered by a hill) is not going to dry off quickly, and will soak into the render given the chance.
Something else to consider is that a wall has a high thermal mass so will remain cold for some time after the heating has switched on, especially if it is damp. Heating the house for short periods could make the problem worse as it will allow moisture removed from elsewhere in the house to condense on the walls before they have a chance to warm up.
A better way might be to continiously heat the rooms with sufficient background heat, leaving the doors partly open so the warm damp air can find it's way out of the room. Or, use a dehumidifier.
Mould also tends to thrive where there is a lack of air movement, so moving furniture away from outside walls will help. Even a few tube heaters below problem areas will greatly help air circulation.
I'd expect the same house in an open situation would not suffer damp problems, the developer probably used a standard design without tailoring it to the surroundings. Your roof looks like it has some moss on the top which indicates how damp the surrounding environment is.
Looks like cavity wall insulation could be the way to go, it will make the rooms easier and cheaper to heat too, but it might be worth consulting an expert on damp to get their opinion.
Anyway sorry for rambling on, hope this helps in some way, Pete
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On Mon, 05 Jan 2004 21:48:44 +0000, Pete C
| |Hi, | |Is the render porous in any way? Any rain landing on a wall in that |situation (surrounded by trees and sheltered by a hill) is not going |to dry off quickly, and will soak into the render given the chance.
I'm sure the render is fine. I drilled holes through it for aerial cables a few weeks ago and it was like reinforced concrete to drill through! Also, the drill-dust was very fine and very dry. The exterior paint is in A1 condition on top of the render. It all looks very new still (the house is only 35 years old).
|Something else to consider is that a wall has a high thermal mass so |will remain cold for some time after the heating has switched on, |especially if it is damp. Heating the house for short periods could |make the problem worse as it will allow moisture removed from |elsewhere in the house to condense on the walls before they have a |chance to warm up.
Ahh. This could be a contributor then. I hate Central Heating at the best of times and two hours a day is about all I can stand! | |A better way might be to continiously heat the rooms with sufficient |background heat, leaving the doors partly open so the warm damp air |can find it's way out of the room. Or, use a dehumidifier. | |Mould also tends to thrive where there is a lack of air movement, so |moving furniture away from outside walls will help. Even a few tube |heaters below problem areas will greatly help air circulation.
I will have a look at this as well, - in that case. | |I'd expect the same house in an open situation would not suffer damp |problems, the developer probably used a standard design without |tailoring it to the surroundings. Your roof looks like it has some |moss on the top which indicates how damp the surrounding environment |is.
True. In the winter this is obviously the case. Although, this _is_ a south-facing house in 'sunny' Devon, and I'm told by the neighbours that it's almost unbearable in Summer unless the front blinds are closed! I'm expecting to make good use of the terrace (shown on the picture mentioned earlier), throughout the spring, summer AND autumn!
|Looks like cavity wall insulation could be the way to go, it will make |the rooms easier and cheaper to heat too, but it might be worth |consulting an expert on damp to get their opinion. | |Anyway sorry for rambling on, hope this helps in some way, |Pete
Certainly does! Thanks very much for your contribution.
H.
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