Re: Mortar Mix



Hi John,
Have a look through the brickwork section on this site:
http://www.pavingexpert.com/pavindex.htm
It should talk you through what you need.
--
BigWallop

http://basecuritysystems.no-ip.com
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A simple 4;1 mix with some plasticiser will do the job ... you can add lime if you have it, but for a small job 4:1 will be good enough.
Apply a coat of diluted PVA first (3 parts PVA to 1 part water) and allow to become tacky before putting down the mortar.
Rick
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You don't need plasticiser with lime. I'm not sure if using both together is counter-productive.
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I wasn't contradicting you. I seem to remember rendering with both and it all went like soap suds until I stopped using the Feb. "If it goes pear shaped read the instructions." I just don't remember what it said on the side of the tin.
It was like working with blancmange and we cobbed two mixes and had problems with the wall we'd already coated. The penny pinching # we did it for made us use the stuff up with the rest of the job. All his walls had tiny cracks in all over. It looked like those tiny mosaic sheets of tiles.
(Ha! Ha!)
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"BigWallop" wrote

Nice link, thanks.
Fletton, frogged on my house. Who'd have thought it !
Cheers,
Paul
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Don't use plasterziser, its crap. Use 4 to 1 sand/cement with Unibond in the water, use the same water and paint both coping and receiving bed of brickwork prior to spreading mortar. Sand and Lime were use for century in the building trade. When cement mortars came used, it was found that this type of mortar was heavy and didn't spread very well. So they introduced plasterzier in to the water. This plasterziser put bubbles in the mortar when mixed. When the bricks are pressed down the bubbles collapse making it easier to level the material being laid. The problem arises when the weather starts to ware away the mortar, its full of dried empty bubbles. In a recent article in one of the construction mags, There are proposals of going back to Lime mortar for brickwork. One of the theories behind the use of Lime mortar is that in the case of any movement in brickwork the joint gives, in cement mortar the bricks give and snap.

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Is the fire in a basket or do the flames actually come in direct contact with the brick work .

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highlighted is due to the use of washing up liquid which won't tamp down. You only use a few ccs -about a large spoonfull of Feb per bucket of water. Bricklaying mix should be strong enough to suit the brick and a little softer than the brick -which is controlled by the ratio of cement to sand.
If you look at the mortar used in old buildings you will see that face work is very close together. It meant that each brick needed to be measured for the bonds to work. Modern courses are 1/2" apart allowing plenty of scope to pull the joints together. Horses for courses. You couldn't use lime mortar on 1/2" beds could you?
Not the same problems as stone though.
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He's not laying bricks. Concrete copings and concrete do not absorb water. Therefore Feb crap want do any good what so ever. On the other hand Unibond will give a better adhesive.

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Wood doesn't burn very hot. You have to wait for the cement to cure over a few day and I believe you start with a very small fire at first to temper it. Not sure though.
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