Re: Converting from TN-S to TN-C-S(PME)



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Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

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30mA isn't a measure of energy, neither is 30mA at 240 volts, you need a time in there as well. It's a totally meaningless comparison.
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Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

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OK !!!!!! it's about the same current value that the electrical impulses to the muscles in your right leg would produce in the time it takes you to swing it over the arse of a horse.
Does this sound better ? :-() LOL
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BigWallop

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But does this mean that by the time you've tripped the RCD you could find that you've accidentally mounted a horse?
That doesn't sound too safe to me......
(well, I'm bored. can't get into a piece of code, and there's no tennis on)
cheers Richard
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

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I've just realised something Chris, you don't have my sense of humour. :-)) If you think of the human body as an electro-chemical machine, then the electrical impulses sent to the large muscles in the leg through your nervous system would amount to around the same amperage as it takes to trip a 30mA RCD unit.
If this is wrong, then show me your proof that it is. If you can't, and there are plenty medical sites on the WWW. to look through, then smile and say to yourself "Well it may be true, it may not". Only one thing else before I go. Why is the trip setting taken to be 30mA ?
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BigWallop

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<snip>

Well, I have a sense of humour, but using 'silly', if not downright stupid, analogies can be extremely misleading for people who don't really have too much understanding about electrical theory.
The advantage of this and similar NGs is that people who are knowledgeable in certain fields can impart some of that knowledge to others who are less knowledgeable. As threads continue, misleading or erroneous information can be shown for what it is, so the overall knowledge base grows.
You are making claims, I suggest, that are not particularly easy to disprove, but equally aren't necessarily valid just because they aren't easy to disprove. They do, however, have little or no bearing on electrical theory.

But surely you know the answer to that question? You probably repeat it to yourself every time you get onto your bike. Of course it also depends on how wide you happen to have your legs[1] as you stand before getting onto your bike.
That's how implausible your analogy happens to be.
[1] As it happens, that will have some bearing on the effects of electric shock, although most people wear shoes that offer some level of (imperfect) protection[2]. It does, however, have a much greater bearing on quadrupeds if the leccy company's stuff goes faulty and they happen to get themselves into a fairly steep potential gradient, i.e. there may be sufficient potential difference between front and back legs to kill the animal - and it *does* happen.
[2] Never trust wellington boots, many are made with a high carbon content.
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Although the linked site I have pasted below doesn't actually substantiate my tounge in cheek babblings, it gives one reason why Residual Current Devices, which detect a fault to earth only, are set in the Amperage region of how they were designed to operate and that they have a set trip time of somewhere around the settings they have been designed to work in. And, due to the fact that I have had training in the treatment of electric shock victims, and I have read the original posters questions and answers, and I have conclude that he is not as stupid as to take my replies as written in stone. Therefore, my replies were given to lighten up a rather long and drawn out waffle about how safe an electrical installation should be. To which, I can only respond with "As safe as is truely possible electricity can be made". The link below shows the effects that an average adult male human being will feel if they come into contact with an electrical potential current flow at certain levels of Amperage. It shows that a certain current level over a certain time is needed to cause these effects, and it gives a rough idea of why an RCD is set the way it is for use in a domestic situation.
http://www.gpnotebook.com/cache/-1865416677.htm
It's basis is on research of electricution on the human body. Although, if someone hasn't done the job right in the first place, as I think the original post was asking, then, as in all circumstances of shoddy workmanship, your arse may be firmly out the window. Now thank you and goodbye to all who have contributed to the safety of the differing technigues that may or may not be used in the installation of a domestic electricity supply. To which the only answer possible is "The technigue that is safest to use in the area in which it is to be used"
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BigWallop

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