Re: Building Warrants - Buying Flat Without

Thanks for the speedy response! However, I would be interested to know if the building warrant situation (or lack of) can be addressed post-purchase. It's a bit easier to call an attic 'floored loft space' than move a bathroom or windows.
Because this is in Scotland (where a building warrant appears to be required for practically any change), I would have thought there would be a higher occurrance of 'post build' warrants than anywhere else. Time to cross post to UK DIY I think and see if anyone there has experience with building warrants.
Leigh
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You fancy popping up to have a look at these windows then?!!! Hehe will get back to them at the weekend methinks.
Leigh

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Cheers James.
At the moment I'm trying to get the seller's to get the work warranted as part of the conditions of sale, primarily 'cos I'd like them to pay for it, and I think the planning dept's more likely to give them it than me (old couple / bigger sympathy vote), plus they did it so if the guy asks questions about the install they can answer them for him. As we're paying 64% over the o/o price for the property, I want the paperwork done and above board before we buy it.
Leigh

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I've not been involved in the Edinburgh property market for a good few years, I'm worried by this....

> Subject: Re: Building Warrants - Buying Flat Without > Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2003 18:35:19 +0100
: : > As we're paying 64% over the o/o price for the property, I want > the paperwork done and above board before we buy it.
Is this a typo?
You are paying 64 percent over the offers over price?
So (all but) two thirds more than they were asking?
Is this the way of the market at the moment? Did you deliberately go over-the-top to land a unique gem, or do you believe that others bidders weren't (going to be) too far behind?
When I were a lad (or some such) the offers over price was meant to be a reasonably serious statement of what the sellers thought the property was worth. It would be round about where the valuation ought to be. Properties sold at around a 10% premium on that.
What sort of valuation did you get?
In another message, you say....
Thankfully the days of having to survey every property before putting in an offer seem to be behind us, as our solicitor recommended against getting any surveys done before getting a place, and just made getting a satisfactory survey a condition of the offer. Out of the last three properties we bit for (2 colonies and a comely bank flat), one had 7 notes of interest, 6 offers and no survey done prior to offering, one had 12 notes of interest 7 offers and no survey, and the latest had 6 notes of interest, 6 offers and 1 survey (valuation). When we got it, we got a homebuyer survey done, rather than buy a copy of the valuation.
I'm not surprised that people are reluctant to survey if o/o prices are barely half what they should be!
Robert.
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Surely all that this discussion tells us is that the o/o price is a complete game played by selling agents and surveyors. When looking for a new flat all that a buyer knows is that they will pay more than the asking price.
Once you have found a property that you are interested in, most solicitors worth their salt should be able to tell you what properties in the same street/ postcode went for in the last few years (all espc solicitors have access to the database of o/o and selling prices), add whatever their magic number is depending on how much the most recent neighbouring property went for, and so give you a fairly good estimate of where the valuation would come in at. Then it is up to you to decide how much to put in on top.
So with a good agent you effectively get the seller's survey that would allow buyers to only survey the property that they end up buying.
Or, alternatively, hunt out fixed price properties, especially scanning the espc website on a Wednesday when they tend to change.
Ford
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"Crawford Buchanan" wrote | Once you have found a property that you are interested in, most | solicitors worth their salt should be able to tell you what properties | in the same street/ postcode went for in the last few years (all espc | solicitors have access to the database of o/o and selling prices),
The most recent date (of registration) and price achieved by house sales (for Scotland) is available online at www.myhouseprice.com Checking the date is free, it costs GBP 1 per house if you want the figure emailed to you (for 2 or more searches in one report)
Owain
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