How loud is 43Db

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Why give it a name then if it is purely abstract?
FWIW, my dictionary says it's a unit for measuring sound.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Because it is a very useful concept and deserves a name. What would you call a decibel then? The unit formerly known as decibel? TUFKAD. Catchy. There are other dimensionless units you would have to expunge, of course. Percent (%) is a useful one that would have to go.

Your dictionary is wrong. It is used to measure power ratios (usually in oscillatory systems of large dynamic range). Sound power is only one of the measurements it is useful for. Amongst other things, it is also used to measure vibrations and to compare electronic signals, not necessarily audio in frequency or nature.
Christian. BEng (Electronic and Electrical Engineering)
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Everybody's right!
Main Entry: decibel Pronunciation: 'de-s&-"bel, -b&l Function: noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary deci- + bel Date: 1928 1 a : a unit for expressing the ratio of two amounts of electric or acoustic signal power equal to 10 times the common logarithm of this ratio b : a unit for expressing the ratio of the magnitudes of two electric voltages or currents or analogous acoustic quantities equal to 20 times the common logarithm of the voltage or current ratio 2 : a unit for expressing the relative intensity of sounds on a scale from zero for the average least perceptible sound to about 130 for the average pain level 3 : degree of loudness; also : extremely loud sound -- usually used in plural www.webster.com
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When dBs are discussed, you can guarantee as many different answers as questions. ;-)
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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wrote:

Oh, it's not abstract, it's real enough. The point though, as already made in another posting, is that it is dimensionless.
CRB
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Think you should read the thread through again. ;-)
To the average human - not measuring instrument - a 10dB reduction results in a halving of the perceived sound level.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Havn't time to catch up on this thread so this may be redundant - but 43 decibles is the sound level we are asked by env health dept not to exceed outside our boundary when we set up our joinery shop in new premises. 43 db being a measurement of the ambient sound in the neighbourhood and equivalent to a suburban street sound level. Its actually 43db level equivalent measured over a sample hour. I don't know if they actually measured it on location or merely took it from tables.
cheers
Jacob
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