Gas safety question

Well with our two dishwashers due to fly the nest soon SWMBO was opining on the subject of a dishwasher. Problem is there is absolutely nowhere to put one in the kitchen without ejecting the washer/drier.
Now muggins here has an idea, there is a large understairs cupboard just outside the kitchen with good underfloor access into which the W/D could relatively easily be plumbed, drained and wired. The only snag is that the gas meter is in there, tucked in the angle of the stairs and part of me wonders at the safety of having a nice sparky motor running in there with it.
So, is this scheme illegal under gas regs or advisable if I install some ventilation along the way?
I suppose I could get the gas meter put outside too but that involves paying someone else (I'm not competent).
Any helpful suggestions appreciated.
Peter
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Take a deep breath, chant calming mantras and then get the meter moved outside: it solves your problem; it means "they" can read it without bothering you; "All gas meters leak a bit, we prefer them outside" my gas fitter said when he did the job for me; after a couple of years you will forget the cost. At least get a quote - that doesn't cost anything.
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Bob Mannix
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On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 10:45:20 +0000, Bob Mannix wrote:

Gas meters are not meant to (nor do they in practice) leak _any_. Every rented home should have its meter (and other gas pipes) checked annually if any leak shows up then it will have to be put right. However although you will have to pay to have the meter put outside (and also pay to have the internal gas pipework changed) it might be a convenient thing for you and thus worth doing.
Otherwise keep 150mm from the gas meter to the electrics. Kepp 25mm from the elctric wires to gas pipes. The meter be subject to damage by the use of the W-D.
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Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
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well, the 'leak' I can smell then must be from the pipework around the meter ;-) Don't worry though, it is a faint smell of gas after the cupboard door has been closed for a while, nothing to worry about.
Peter
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On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 08:03:43 +0000, Peter Ashby wrote:

small risk by themselves the danger is that the small leak might be come a big leak. And because you are used to the smell you take no action.
The chances are that the leak is not on your installation pipework but on some of Transco's kit. Phone 0800 111 999 and get them to check it and fix it for free. The only real risk is that they find a leak in your installation pipework instead and shut the gas off.
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Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at www.diyfaq.org.uk
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good advice, thankyou.
Peter
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Yes, you are right, I was being sloppy, what he actually said was that the connections to the gas meters tend to leak, especially if the meters get bashed about. The meters themselves shouldn't leak. With respect to the op it doesn't make a difference but I should have worded it better.
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I believe you're supposed to have 150mm separation between electrics and the gas meter, but I'm no CORGI.
You should install ventilation anyway for a washer dryer. I would suggest floor vents to the presumable already ventilated floor void.
Christian.
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That makes sense and would scupper my plan without getting the meter moved. I suppose I should make enquiries.

That is another good point. Thanks for both.
Peter
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On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 10:49:29 -0000, Christian McArdle wrote:

I may be wrong, but I have a feeling that natural gas is lighter than air, so floor vents aren't of much use unless there's a good breeze blowing through to stir up the air.
Steve W
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I was thinking more about getting rid of the moisture from the washer dryer.
Christian.
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They are if combined with higher level vents as you get a natural rising flow which carries the light gas with it.
Peter
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On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 10:43:40 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@blueyonder.co.uk (Peter Ashby) wrote:

leak!.
Just provide the necessary ventilation to outside for your drier and thats it,job done. Ensure there is access to read the meter.
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