Are open fireplaces considered desirable by the average house-buyer?

I'm doing up a room in my Victorian terraced house.The room used to have an open fire which was long ago blocked up and plastered over. I'm thinking of opening it up again. The room has a central heating radiator on another wall, so the fire isn't needed for heating - it'll be purely for looks. However I want to add value to the property rather than tract from it. I'm not sure how the average house-buyer rates open fireplaces.
What is the concensus? Are open fires liked or disliked?
Personally I can see several disadvantages: draughts coming down the chimney, ash and soot threatening to mess up the carpet, etc.
Thanks for your opinions.
Frank
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I think in period properties in particular things like this are valued, in general period features are a positive. Ok this would be a new one, but done well in the correct period style the house would benefit.
It probably won't add much value to the house, but it will probably improve it's attractiveness to buyers.

Drafts are easily dealt with - you can get balloon type things that go up the chimney
--
Chris French, Leeds

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We had two open fires (the house originally and 4 plus a range in the kitchen.) We found in no wind the fire didn't draw and the smoke blew back in high wind the fire roared and the heat went up the chiminey. We however wanted a fire as it's a good addition to hugely expensive LPG gas, and we have lots of trees that need prunning. So we have no fitted a stove, (traditional box type) in the living room, which has a large glasss window it works very well ,is very controllable and heats the kettle when the electricity goes off in the winter. For the "best room" we are going to fit, an inset stove ie a stove that is built in , it still has an entire steel inner case but has an outer one as well, between the two air circulates and so most of the heat still flows out to the room. dust aand smoke is contained but you still have that nice warm fire ... The Q
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I like open fires as they are untamed and have character about them that "living flame" gas fires can never match; they are really a bit like smoking a pipe, since you're forever fiddling with them, adjusting the logs and vent etc. For me they are a plus, but I cannot speak for others. Many people think uPVC is the best thing since sliced bread, but I think it's ugly and heartless, but I seem to be in a minority. I've never had problems with smoke blowing back or a good draw, I guess that depends the height and situation of your chimney. As for draughts, if you get a wood stove or inset firebox, both of these have vents which allow more economical burning and importantly control of draughts when the fire is out of action.
Andy.

a
box
well
in
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Andy You're not alone, I deeply loathe uPVC etc in any period building. Toby
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On Fri, 18 Jul 2003 19:43:34 +0100, "The Q"

Oh, yes - that's an idea... Thee was one of those in my parents' house when I was a boy... made of cast iron, with asbestos panes in the doors IIRC...
Thanks for the suggestion,
Frank
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Thanks to everyone for the input. Do those gas powered imitation coal fires require a flue?
Frank
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(Frank Z) writes:

I believe they use forced ventilation i.e a motor driving a fan; this allows buildings with no chimney or one shorter than about 16 feet to support a fire.
Andy
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Neil wrote:

A plumbers blowlamp and dry wood - use up all those D-I-Y offcuts - is the way to light a D-I-Y-ers log fire.
:_
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On Sat, 19 Jul 2003 21:42:32 +0000 (UTC), "Woodspoiler"

he he! Very good. I did a bit more easearch on them today and it turns out they comprise a catalytic converter - I guess that means you only suffocate from lack of oxygen, rather than dying from carbon monoxide poisoning...;)
Frank
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