Advice please: Oil Tank Location

Hi,
Our local Medieval church is trying to sort out its heating which is at least 50 years old and only half functioning.
Our plan is to convert from the existing expensive electric heating to use oil and fan assisted radiators. To do this we need to site a new boiler and oil tank. The ideal place (low impact) is in the old boiler room in the 'cellar' of he church.
Does anyone know if it is allowable to site an oil tank in the same room as the boiler. If so, what precautions need to be taken?
Cheers, Colin
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Colin wrote:

I cannot find anything in the regulations that says you cannot.
I would actualy suggest you phone up the local fire station and
ask to speak to the safety officer? I think thats the name -
anyway the one who deals with educating joe public.
I know that my sisters old house in Germany had a massive combi and oil tank in teh cellar - only a meter or so between them - and that was relatively recent install - 10-15 years ago IIRC.
Anoher approach is to talk to the local building inspector.
Things are strict for 'publc places' and he may or may not let you.
Sorry, have no exact answer, only suggestins on how to find one...gut feel is yes, you can.

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"Colin" wrote | Our local Medieval church is trying to sort out its heating which is at | least 50 years old and only half functioning. | Our plan is to convert from the existing expensive electric heating
What is the current form of electric heating? Tubular heaters below the pews to heat the air rising into the roof and tubular heaters below the windows to counteract the draughts, by any chance?
You might want to look at electric infra-red heaters, which warm the people not the air. Ideal if heating is only required sporadically as they are instantaneous. If gas is an option, places like DIY sheds and sports halls are heated by long continuous gas-heated 'black heat' tubes near the ceiling.
Owain
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pews
people
Nothing so complex I am afraid. The heating was installed in the 60's (I think) and seems to consist of an array of a dozen (or so) of emersion heaters in a tank to heat a reservoir of water. The water is pumped through a dozen (or so) radiators around the church. The radiators get hot, but as the ceiling is so high, we are only really warming the bats. The plan is to install fan assisted radiators.
Colin
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windows
halls
through
to
Underfloor heating is ideal for churches. But expensive to install. And if the floor is old and has a protection order on it.....
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"Colin" wrote | > What is the current form of electric heating? Tubular heaters below the | > pews to heat the air rising into the roof and tubular heaters below the | > windows to counteract the draughts, by any chance? | Nothing so complex I am afraid. The heating was installed in the 60's (I | think) and seems to consist of an array of a dozen (or so) of emersion | heaters in a tank to heat a reservoir of water.
A home-made electric boiler, how quaint.
| The radiators get hot, but as the ceiling is so high, we are only really | warming the bats. The plan is to install fan assisted radiators.
Even with fan-assisted, you will still be warming the bats because hot air rises. Fan-assisted merely adds draughts and noises to the original. I still think infra-red would be worth considering. Because it is so thermally responsive it can be run on PIR sensors responding to building occupancy. I think both the following are 'visible radiant' heat.
http://www.edw-uk.com/e-wholesaler/Dimplex/item_vector.htm "Low running costs - because only the occupants are heated, not the air space around them. This is by far the most efficient way of heating large volume, high heat loss environments. Silent operation. Instant heat - avoiding the need for expensive pre-heating of intermittently used buildings." and suggests 260W/m2 for churches.
http://www.hycomanufacturing.co.uk/infraredheaters.html
If you can convert to gas, consider http://www.ambirad.co.uk/prod.htm " As from August 2002 high efficiency AR radiant tube heaters (All models except AR13) meet the qualifying criteria for inclusion on the governments energy technology listing. This can entitle end users to claim 100% capital allowances (including the direct costs of installation) in the first year."
http://www.churchcare.co.uk/atoz_heating.php This site lists several disadvantages to radiant heating, but does say "It is the opinion of the Wall Paintings Conservation Department of the Courtauld Institute that Quartzray heaters are the least damaging form of heating to be installed in churches where there are ancient wall paintings; this opinion should be borne in mind." The main opposition to radiant heating seems to be when it heats the head only, but it may be a useful adjunct to other systems eg a radiant heater inside the door may help to provide an immediate feeling of warmth on entry.
I suppose you have worked out how you are going to get a whopping big oil tank into the cellar, and how the tanker driver is going to fill it with a possibly dirty hose?
Alternatively you'll just have to go happy-clappy and jump up and down a lot to keep warm!
Owain
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still
I
The one recommended are supposed to hold the air a few inches above the ground for a distance of 15 feet. It uses some sort of starnge effect to achieve this. (Could be magic?)

Transco quoted us over 20K to run gas to the church!

Great idea. I'll propose it at the next meeting... Thanks.

The entrance is external to the church. A friendly oil supply company proved they could reach the church by driving one of their tankers up there. They also have a 200 foot reach on their hose.

lot
Thermal underwear for *all* the parishioners was my suggestion. Much, much cheaper.
Colin
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use
and
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as
As the installation is non domestic it immediately requires a secondary containment (double skinned tank or enclosing in a bund)
The location within the boiler room is out unless the room is properly subdivided to form a fireproof tank chamber completely seperate to the boiler room and Church. This tank chamber must be built to provide three hour fire resistance - not a cheap option by any means!
If the graves are suitably located you could consider a buried tank outside the Church building.
I suggest you contact OFTEC for a current set of standards and specifications www.oftec.org should be a good point of entry.
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outside
A buried tank sounds like a good option. (Plenty of experience of digging holes around the church.)
Any references as to where we can find out more?
Regards, Colin Baker
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OFTEC www.oftec.org or Ask at one of your local plumbing and heating suppliers such as Plumb Centre or one of the myriad competitors. They will be in contact with suitable tank manufacturers and can advise accordingly
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