Wiring cable

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wrote:

My cable provider (rogers) did all the cable work for free, including splitters. My main line comes into a 3 way wideband 5-1000mhz) splitter with 1 3.3db and 2 7db taps. The 3.5 goes to a second 3 way wideband splitter. One 7 goes to the cable modem, and one to the digital TV box. From the second splitter, the 3.5 gos to the tv farthest from the splitter, the 2 7db taps go to the basement tv and the tuner card on my basement computer.
Both splitters are Regal model ZDS3DGH10 if that helps. All cabling is quad sheild commscope RG6.
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The cable modem should really come out of the 3.5db port. You will notice better performance in your computer, also if you have VOIP phone service.
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On Sun, 12 Apr 2009 04:11:01 -0700 (PDT), Mike rock

No, because then you have 3.5+3.5 plus 4 connectors - each pair of which is something like 3.5db (total of ~14db) loss.for the digital tv. The cable tech that did the install explained why he did it this way - the cable modem is less than a foot from the splitter and the cable modem does not need as strong a signal as the digital box. The digital box has only 2 connectors and the splitter - and it and the modem both finally work just fine. With digital they don't reccomend wall jacks because the add another connector and its associated losses..
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wrote:

Is that anything like RG-6, which is easier to find around here?

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Gary H wrote:

Same thing.
--
"You can lead them to LINUX
but you can\'t make them THINK"
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wrote:

You should definitely put two outlets in each room (on opposite walls); I wish I'd done that. You don't have to make them all "active" -- just the ones that will actually be used. Run all of the wires to a central location, label them, and connect just the in-use ones. You'll thank yourself when you rearrange the furniture and just have to go change one connection at the central splitter (or, in my case, curse the fact that you didn't install an outlet on *that* side of the room).
Same with Cat5e/6 runs -- run them and leave them unconnected at the wiring hub until needed. I suspect you'll never sit around and wish you hadn't run a particular wire, but you will regret the one you decided not to run someday.
Josh
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Makes sense. I think the only drawback may be that this will be pre-wiring for an apartment that I am doing over and that will be rented out to a tenant. If I put 2 outlets per room, I think I would need to make them both live because the tenant won't have access to the wiring hub area at will.
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wrote:

If you string splitters one after another, you'll need signal amplifers periodically in the string. I put in my coax after the house was built. I have a central location in my bedroom with two strings leaving from there, providing signal to 8 locations, and where every second splitter would be, I had to use a 110 volt signal amplifier. I would never embed them in the wall even if it were easy.
Most of this is avoided by using a fully central location. Although if hte power splitter ever fails (and I don't know how often this happens(, if it fails completely, which I think it woudl, it will take out every co-ax location and require the replacement of the main power splitter.
That doesn't mean your central location should be at your bedroom, but what you should consider are two things a) distributing internet radio from your computer to devices that make sound, and b) distributing internet television from your computer to your tvs. My friend is willing to watch a few tv shows at her desk, but I want them to be everywhere I can watch tv, with good seating, bigger screens if I ever get a bigger screen, and in the kitchen for when I want to watch while eating.
I probably only have to run one coax from the office PC to the bedroom central location for the tv, but I haven't done it yet, and I don't know your situation and if there's a better way to connect the locations. I would rather run speaker wires for the radio connections than have to play the radio through tv's, which will put added wear on the tv and use maybe 30 times as much current. Especially since when I play broadcast radio, I may have the radios in 5 locations on 3 floors, for a total of about 40 watts. 30 times would be 240 watts, and that's too much.
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It will work, just remember, a 3-way splitter has two -7db outputs and one -3.5db outputs. put the cable modem on the -3.5db output as you will want the least signal loss for your cable modem and also if you have VOIP phone service. The TV signal is not as critical

As long as they go up to 900 MHZ or better, you should be fine.
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For cable, get a small (2 way) distribution amp instead of splitting so many times, withe the DA you will not lose signal quality also the 2 way DA will support digital interactions. Mount the DA close to the entry then home run each room from there with RG6 Quad Shield cables. Also suggest you run a send and receive cable to each room so that you can watch devices in other rooms by re-distributing RF.
I'm running gigabit speed on my LAN using cat5e right now, but for the little extra cost I would do cat6 again home run from a central switch.
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Does a hard wired home LAN make sense anymore? I did that when I moved into this house 10 years ago but WiFi would be my choice today. Heck, had to use WiFi to connect to a basement computer anyway.
If you have analog CATV now you should bear in mind that digital CATV may be just around the corner from your CATV provider. Those digital CATV boxes (one for each TV) are must less forgiving when it comes to splitting and the quality of cables. Rather than repeat, hear are some links you should be aware of;
http://www.dslreports.com/faq/cabletech http://www.cabletvamps.com/Info/TV_AMP_EDUCATION.htm

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