Wiring an electric stove

I am installing an electric stove and there is not a 220 plug in. I have 220 to my dryer. Can I break that line, put in a junction box and the run seperate lines to my dryer and stove?
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no, they should be on separated breakers
I am installing an electric stove and there is not a 220 plug in. I have 220 to my dryer. Can I break that line, put in a junction box and the run seperate lines to my dryer and stove?
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wrote:

Not just "should" but this is a requirement.
Also, different wire sizes and circuit breakers are most likely to be required. Normally this is 30 A for Dryers and 50 A for Ranges.
New construction requires a 4 wire outlet - (2 hots - 1 Neutral - 1 Protective Safety Ground Wire). A corresponding mating appliance cord should be purchased of the required ampacity.
Beachcomber
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Where is the fourth wire attached.

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This either a troll or? 1) A dryer on its individual circuit (in North American practice) requires for most/all dryer models, 30 amps at 230 volts, double pole fuse/breaker, 3 wire (Hot, hot, and ground usually red, black and ground). 20 A typical North American (domestic) stove requires 50 amps at 230 volts, double pole fuse/breaker, 4 wire (Hot, hot, neutral and ground usually red, black, white and ground). Am I correct that #1 requires minimum #10 AWG and #2 minimum #8 AWG. also dependent (voltage drop) on length of wire run from circuit breaker/fuse panel to the appliance?
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wrote:

Correct except #1, the newly installed 30A 240V dryer now requires a 4 wire installation, just like the electric range. Older 3-wire installations may be permitted with a 3-wire cordet to the appliance.
The 4 wires are hot (black), hot (red), neutral (white) and ground (green or bare conductor)
In 1944, the code was changed to permit dryers and ranges to be wired with 3 wires configured so the neutral was also the ground. The idea was, save the extra wire for the war effort. (That's WWII for you youngsters out there).
It took over 50 years to change it back to the 4 wire requirements. People were receiving shocks from their dryers, so now the NEC requires 4 wires for dryers and ranges in all new construction.
Beachcomber
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On Sat, 22 Apr 2006 19:32:56 -0400, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

I have separate electric oven and cooktop. They are on separate 30A circuits.

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Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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I don't see your point

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