Wiremold in a garage


I installed an outlet several feet from an existing outlet using NON metallic wiremold in a residential finished (plasterboard) GARAGE, which is an integral part of the house. The cable used was romex 14-2 with ground type NM. All works well. Question (after the fact): Is NON metallic wiremold satisfactory or should I have used METALLIC wiremold? tia
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In typed:

Actually, the best place to ask that question would be at your local code enforcement office. See the yellow pages of blue pages of gvt offices. They have the last work on codes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 23 May 2010 19:59:23 -0400, shellyfD_ELET snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

We used plastic wiremold for hospitals. The only thing we had to do extra was to mount it to the wall with anchors. The glue was not acceptable.
In many areas, romex is allowed without the wiremold.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/23/2010 5:49 PM Metspitzer spake thus:

Romex? Really? I'd think not. Conduit, yes. MC cable, sure (well, probably: I've used it in closets), but not Romex.
At least I wouldn't even try it.
--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 24 May 2010 15:14:05 -0700, David Nebenzahl

The strange thing is that there are placed that let you run Romex exposed on running boards in utility areas. It is really just what your local building department calls "exposed to physical damage". For that matter MC cable is not allowed if it is exposed to physical damage either. I have seen the acceptable wiring method to be Romex to ENT to the various flexible armored wiring methods to PVC (still not legal if exposed to physical damage) or EMT which bumps you up to less than "severe" physical damage. That is the same as wire mold
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 23 May 2010 19:59:23 -0400, shellyfD_ELET snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

They are both listed for use in places exposed to physical damage but not "severe physical damage". The difference is purely a judgement call. That is the same rule they have for EMT.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I guess the QUESTION is, what is the RISK? For example if there is SEVERE risk of PHYSICAL damage, or CONFLICT between the wiremold and other things (might get DAMAGED by a GARDEN RAKE), then there is CAUSE for CONCERN. On the OTHER hand, perhaps the WIRE MOLD is in a remote part of the GARAGE where there is no RISK of damage.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why not just use 1/2" plastic conduit. The plastic stuff provides a lot more protection that the wiremold and if you avoid the boxes you can freely use a hose to wash the walls down.
Use plenty of clamps just in case someone tries to use a box or the conduit as a step.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In

If you plan to use plastic outdoors, be sure to check the UV resistance etc.. Some of the cheap stuff will crumble in just a few years sitting in the sun.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.