Window removal

I was chatting with a buddy of mine about replacing my windows and I mentioned that I was planning on removing the siding to get to the window. He basically shook his head and mentioned that typically what is done is a circular saw is run around the perimeter of the window and that is what is used to remove the window. Basically he described it as cutting out the siding that hides the window frame and attachpoints then installing the new window, then using 1x2's or whatever to frame the window and cover up the cut the circular saw made.
Is he basically correct here. For some reason I just can't see myself taking a circular saw to the siding as proper window replacement.
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Visit www.pella.com or the Andersen window site and download instructions on installing their windows. Read warranties. Without proper flashing, you might as well keep your old windows. The flashing should go beyond the window frame width so I don't see how you can do it right without removing the siding unless you use very wide trim. The flashing is also supposed to be attached to the paper underneath the siding (assuming you have tyvek or something similar).

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Without seeing a picture of the house, I have to ask why you can't pop in some replacement windows and not do any cutting.
If you are cutting out the frames to put in bigger windows or something, the siding will be the least of your worries.
Eigenvector wrote:

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http://photos.imageevent.com/eigenvector/various/websize/P8190010.JPG
http://photos.imageevent.com/eigenvector/various/websize/P8190009.JPG
http://photos.imageevent.com/eigenvector/various/websize/P8190008.JPG
That's basically what my windows are like, standard 1960 single pane aluminum frame.

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Take your pictures down to your building supply store and talk to them about vinyl replacement windows and how to install them. It is very likely that you can put some in without touching the outside. If you're feeling industrious, you might carefully take out a window and remove the sill and sides to see what's there and take pics of that too.
I would guess that if you raise the window, you can take out the glass. Do so. Then gently pry up the inside sill and remove it. Then figure out how to remove the bottom plate of the window. Likely it's just a couple of screws. Take that out. Then, basically the window comes into piece in front of you when you take out the side screws. No reason to cut the siding. I'm no expert on windows, but almost everyone one I've seen come out (and goes in) from the inside.
Once you've measured them up, they just order them in whatever size you need.
If you want to start hacking around because you want bigger windows, get ready for a major project because you have serious structural issues to deal with then (replacing the header, etc.).
Eigenvector wrote:

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Eigenvector wrote:

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On Sat, 19 Aug 2006 20:38:02 -0700, "Eigenvector"

I don't know how common my windows are. They are sliding windows with 4 grooves, 2 for windows and 2 for storm windows, so since they don't use thermopane, I guess that means they're cheap.**
When the guy in the next townhouse had his windows replaced, the workman took the panes out of the frames*** and used a sawsall to make one or two cuts in the alumininum window frame, but in the frame only and not in any of the wood. ***Maybe he had removed screws through the frame into the wood, but if so I missed that part. I guess there must be screws or the windows would fall out.
Then they slid out the rest of the frame, or it just folded in on itself. Then he just slid the new frame in, screwed it in, I guess, and put the panes in. He didn't touch the siding. He finished up by making a little rectangular tube from plain white aluminum that he atttached above the window, and a smaller one for below, on top of the t1-11 siding. It makes his window look bigger than mine, and the extra white frame might have a nice appearance, but I'm still pleased with mine, which goes from brown wall to glass window, with only an inch of aluminmum in between.
I'm also a little disgusted to realize that the decoration around at least some of the windows I see is hollow. I know there has always been imitation stuff like this, but it's better for me when I don't know where.
He also applied thin lines of white caulk outside between the frame and the wood and between the tubes and the t1-11. He made the edges of the caulk straight. If you can't caulk well practice somewhere else. The look of the caulk will be more important I think than the look of the windows.
(The guy I bought my house from was cold all the time and caulked everywhere, and never did learn how. You want to push the nozzle of the tube away from you as you put down the caulk and use the size of the opening and the nozzle to delimit the width of caulk lines. He seemed to have been pulling it back, and had no control over thickness. And if he then used his finger to push down the thick parts, he made them too wide. Push, don't pull.
ALL of this was done from the inside of the house. It took him iirc 2 or 3 hours to do 3 windows, and the biggest single chunk of time, maybe a fourth or third of the total, was making those rectangular tubes.
**I suppose after a while the fuzzy strip between the storm windows and the windows falls off, so that would be bad, but I'm careful to glue that stuff back when it starts to get loose. I guess eventually the fuzzy strip won't be fuzzy anymore, will be bald, so that will leak air for sure.
But the only really bad part now is that while I'm lying in bed, I can reach up and open or close the window, but not the storm window. So if it is closed, I have to sit up, get on my knees and turn around to open or close the storm window Also I have to stick my fingers almost between the windows to open the storm windows. These are not big problems. I also get condensation on the aluminum frames inside, but it hasn't damaged the window sill after 27 years, hasn't even hurt the paint. I don't know how much heat loss this represents. But while neighbors are replacing their windows, I still don't think it is worth it.

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That may be the way the hacks do it. It is not they way it would be done on a house of mine.
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