window air conditioners and extension cords

Hi,
Is it safe to use extension cords with window air conditioners?
Thanks for all replies.
Debbie ____ Deborah Oney Blood Recall / Withdrawal - Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) http://members.aol.com/debbieoney/blood.htm CJD Watch - The International CJD Tracker http://www.fortunecity.com/healthclub/cpr/349/part1cjd.htm
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DebbieOney wrote:

Yes. A heavy-duty extension cord rated for the air conditioner's wattage. Use as short a cord as you can to reduce the voltage drop.
Bob
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (DebbieOney) wrote in

You didn't say how long the extension cord would be, and that is a factor to consider. In general, you should be able to use a cord that meets or exceeds the existing the capacity of the line cord on the air conditioner. The longer the cord, the the greater capacity it should be.
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DebbieOney wrote:

The power gets to the wall from the circuit breaker via a long wire. It's just in the wall and generally pretty thick.
So, depending on how big the AC is and how long the cord is, the answer is either "Yes" or "No".
If your AC draws under 14 amps (and never more), then your typical 50' orange extension cord that is rated for 14 amps will work for you.
if it's a huge 220Volt/30Amp AC unit, then you'll make a lot of heat in the orange extension cord right before it melts in two. With or without sparks.
In short, more info would get better answers.
Cords have a power rating. It should exceed the needs of the AC.
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The instructions with the AC unit are likely to include details of what size and length of cord is safe.
DebbieOney wrote:

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Depends on who wrote the instructions, technical writers or the lawyers. As the years go by in our "SUE YOU!" society, you are much more likely to find a big, boldface WARNING that you can not use extention cords plastered in the front of the book along with all of the other cover-your-ass material. So much safer for them than giving you details on what you can/can't use.
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I-zheet M'drurz wrote:

There are times that IS the right answer.
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Maybe AC makers have some minimum voltage in mind, below which the motor starts drawing more current and overheating, based on an assumption that it's plugged into an NEC wall socket. Meanwhile, extension cord makers mark them "15 Amps," while imagining a motor at the far end. A well-meaning person might figure it's OK to use 2 15 A cords in series. Maybe it isn't.
Nick
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On 04 Aug 2004 04:29:59 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (DebbieOney) wrote:

such a way that it can't overheat or be damaged. Don't run it under carpet or across a walkway.
Ace has a selection of these cords. Check http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId 86875&cp54879.1254955.1259176&page=2&pageBucket=0&parentPagemily to get an idea of what you are looking for.
Steve B.
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