Why drive off wooden windowills?


I had the wood-framed windows on the West side redone recently by a professional painter. They were in terrible shape from years of neglect and hot sun. I had prepped some of the sills by sanding a few years ago, but gave up because the upper part of the frames were so messed up; finally hired a pro.,
He prepped everything carefully and applied 2 coats of primer and a coat of Benjamin Moore acrylic outdoor paint.
Here's my q: He advised wiping dew/condensation off the window sills every morning to avoid deteriorating the new job. (This is So. Calif coastal).
I don't understand why that is necessary, though I will do it if this distinguished body so advises. My thought was that the dew/condensation will evaporate anyhow when the sun hits it.
Your thoughts?
TIA
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Odds are he has seen some problems in the past. To be sure, why not call B-M customer service and ask them? It may be that latex paints of today develop water resistance rather slowly as they cure (as opposed to 'dry'). Water from any source then will affect the bond to the substrate. With that information, seems sensible to help the new finish get extra life. HTH
Joe.
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The point is that before the dew evaporates it collects in individual droplets (present for an hour or two) and the sunshine affects the paint surface differently, (a) shining directly on a dry surface (b) shining through a bead of water like a magnifying lens. This can cause the paint to appear mottled.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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OK, point taken. I've been meaning to get up earlier anyway. Get out there & wipe first thing in morning.
I just HATE when the days get shorter -- and will get much shorter after Hallowe'en. WHY don't they just get rid of the (&&^$(_+7& Daylight Savings Time on in the Spring, off in the Fall. Exactly the opposite of what it should be, if at all!

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On Tue, 16 Sep 2008 21:45:22 -0700 (PDT), Artful Dodger

Water is bad for wood. Make sure the caulk is good. Clean, apply paste wax, and buff. If water puddles, wipe it up as soon as possible. We have issues when it's cold outside and making a large pot of home-made soup. More air movement (and sun) helps.
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OK, thanks - but just to be sure: You're advising me to apply paste wax to acrylic paint on wooden OUTDOOR window sills on W. (sunny) side of house?
Wondering if your reference to home-made soup (I'll be right over!) means you thought these were INDOOR wood sills. Pls. clarify, tx.
If you do mean OUTDOOR wood sills, is there any downside to waxing? Like, maybe focusses sun more strongly on wood?
Inquiring minds...
TIA
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On Fri, 19 Sep 2008 13:12:39 -0700 (PDT), Artful Dodger

Sorry, paste wax is for interior windowsills.
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Congratulations on finding a Professional!

Besides the other perspectives here I'd guess the water would evaporate and leave any sea salt. I'd also guess you'd only have to wipe them off for a week or so, until the paint has reached an advanced state of cure. -----
- gpsman
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